"Elevated fire weather conditions"

Boyd

Administrator
Staff member
Site Administrator
Jul 31, 2004
9,526
2,787
Ben's Branch, Stephen Creek
Special Weather Statement
National Weather Service Mount Holly NJ
335 AM EST Sat Nov 18 2023

DEZ001>004-MDZ012-015-019-020-NJZ001-007>010-012>027-182300-
New Castle-Kent-Inland Sussex-Delaware Beaches-Kent MD-
Queen Annes-Talbot-Caroline-Sussex-Warren-Morris-Hunterdon-
Somerset-Middlesex-Western Monmouth-Eastern Monmouth-Mercer-Salem-
Gloucester-Camden-Northwestern Burlington-Ocean-Cumberland-
Atlantic-Cape May-Atlantic Coastal Cape May-Coastal Atlantic-
Coastal Ocean-Southeastern Burlington-
Including the cities of Wilmington, Dover, Georgetown,
Rehoboth Beach, Chestertown, Centreville, Easton, Denton, Newton,
Washington, Morristown, Flemington, Somerville, New Brunswick,
Freehold, Sandy Hook, Trenton, Pennsville, Glassboro, Camden,
Cherry Hill, Moorestown, Mount Holly, Jackson, Millville,
Hammonton, Cape May Court House, Ocean City, Atlantic City,
Long Beach Island, and Wharton State Forest
335 AM EST Sat Nov 18 2023


...ELEVATED RISK FOR THE SPREAD OF WILDFIRES TODAY...

Elevated fire weather conditions are expected today across
portions of New Jersey, Delaware, and northeastern Maryland.
Relative humidity values are forecast to drop to around 30 to 40
percent this afternoon, lowest in southern New Jersey and
portions of the northern Delmarva peninsula. Northwest winds will
increase to around 15 to 20 mph with gusts to around 25 to 30
mph. Antecedent fuel conditions remain dry due to a lack of
rainfall over the past several weeks.

Residents and visitors are urged to exercise caution if handling
any potential fire ignition sources, such as open flames,
cigarettes, matches, and equipment that creates sparks. Dispose
of smoking materials and other flammable items in appropriate
containers. Keep vehicles off of dry grass and obey local burn
bans. Dry grasses, dead leaves, and other tree litter could
easily ignite and spread fire quickly.

Outdoor burning is strongly discouraged. For more information about
wildfire danger, burn restrictions, and wildfire prevention and
education, please visit your state`s forestry or environmental
protection website.
 
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Boyd

Administrator
Staff member
Site Administrator
Jul 31, 2004
9,526
2,787
Ben's Branch, Stephen Creek
Screen Shot 2023-11-18 at 6.27.20 PM.png
 

Boyd

Administrator
Staff member
Site Administrator
Jul 31, 2004
9,526
2,787
Ben's Branch, Stephen Creek
59 percent humidity at 68 degrees in my little studio/workroom which is separated from my bedroom with a partition. I leave the heat on low in the bathroom after my morning shower and that helps a lot in these two rooms, I use a small humidifier as the day goes on. Burning the woodstove on a cold day, the rest of the house can get very dry however.
 
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stiltzkin

Explorer
Feb 8, 2022
455
602
Medford
I installed a whole-house evaporative humidifier a couple years ago. It's controlled automatically by the smart thermostat and has helped tremendously in the winter. A bit of a project to install but very doable. Worth considering something like this if you happen to have central forced-air heat.
 

stiltzkin

Explorer
Feb 8, 2022
455
602
Medford
Yes, you have to be careful with it when it gets extremely cold outside. I manually turn it down when it gets well below freezing or if I notice condensation.

Ideally the Nest would be smart enough to adjust the humidity threshold based on outdoor temperature, but despite being a "smart" thermostat, it's not quite that smart.
 
Jul 12, 2006
1,322
311
Gloucester City, NJ
I guess I'm the odd man out. I prefer the dryer conditions and lower humidity. During our summers, it's not the heat that gets me, it's always been the humidity.

I welcome the lower dew points and the dryness in the house this time of year.
 
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enormiss

Explorer
Aug 18, 2015
579
373
Atco NJ
I don’t have a humidifier, and fire up the wood stove often. I don’t recall my thermostat showing the humidity below 40%. Googling has “normal” indoor as between 30%-60%. 30 seems awful low. What do y’all consider a good winter % ?
 

imkms

Explorer
Feb 18, 2008
587
224
SJ and SW FL
I don’t have a humidifier, and fire up the wood stove often. I don’t recall my thermostat showing the humidity below 40%. Googling has “normal” indoor as between 30%-60%. 30 seems awful low. What do y’all consider a good winter % ?
In the 40% range seems to work well, but as the temperature drops it’s recommended that the interior humidity also drop or condensation could form on the windows, etc. I no longer use a central, heater based humidifier as every one I’ve ever installed (ex-plumber who has installed dozens of them) eventually rots out or rusts the ductwork. Instead I use a free standing unit in the bedroom and when needed another one in the another room.
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ecampbell

Piney
Jan 2, 2003
2,841
964
My house has gas forced hot air with a humidifier which I have no control over. Indoor humidity is 45%.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,190
4,291
Pines; Bamber area
In my rental house, I bought a floor model I'm happy with. Currently gulps 4 or 5 gallons of water in 24 hours. I bought two of these indicators to keep an eye on it. Above 50 and I get a smiley face. I'm usually between 50 and 55 or so.

1701445214018.png

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enormiss

Explorer
Aug 18, 2015
579
373
Atco NJ
I like that temp/humidity based table. Doesn’t appear I have a need for a humidifier as I’m always above the recommended %. Hopefully that’s not an indication of another problem but it’s been like this for as long as I’ve noticed. I’m currently at 68% but have a lot of company here staying the weekend plus just cooked breakfast. I get a notification when it goes over 70% and that doesn’t happen in winter but it’s normal for me in spring & fall without the AC on.
 
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