Forest Fires and Survival

freerider

Explorer
Jan 3, 2008
271
11
I keep marshmellows on hand when I live in the pines......and sleep with a smoke alarm.

Was caught in a fire 20 years ago that burned near dover rd Bamber lake area...... I had been living in my car for a time..... No matter which way I went there was fire I drove my way out eventually.
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
8,530
2,418
59
millville nj
www.youtube.com
Whip and I have gotten in behind several fires after they pass and are still burning,the last bombing range started fire for one and another between nescohague and the mullica in the 90's and followed the fire.Many dead trees still on fire around us and always find at least a couple dead box turles. A very desolate place to be but proabably about as safe a place to be as there is as long as a dead and burning tree don't fall on you.
 

freerider

Explorer
Jan 3, 2008
271
11
There are many areas that need a big hot burn some are overwhelmed with oak or fuel on the ground.

Would love to get some better picks of fire aftermath.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,100
4,191
Pines; Bamber area
There are many areas that need a big hot burn some are overwhelmed with oak or fuel on the ground. Would love to get some better picks of fire aftermath.

This one is a classic from one when we explored the Warren Grove Wildfire in 2007. We came upon a pitch pine cone that exploded open from the heat, and see the seedlings that flew out coming up (6 months after the fire).

EXPLOSION_1.jpg
 
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freerider

Explorer
Jan 3, 2008
271
11
Yup thats some of the images I am looking to capture in next fire.

The controlled burns I have been at didnt seem to
Create much new growth.

I am hoping the area with the crowberry by the range will be burned hot this year.
 

local vollie

Scout
Apr 6, 2011
46
3
The time it takes for a gas tank to rupture and explode is certainly longer than the time it would take for a wildland head fire to pass through. I am not saying that one should remain in the vehicle for an extended period of time. In most instances, the fire will pass in 30-60 seconds. The vehicle acts as a temporary shield from the intense heat. Once the fire front passes, the remaining fire is quite survivable. The smoke has now become your problem. With a moderate breeze, this too shall subside rather quickly. I would hope that this never happens to anyone on this forum. Just trying to lend some advice that may save someone's life.
 
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