NATURE CONSERVANCY RECEIVES LAND AT EAST PLAINS PRESERVE

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NATURE CONSERVANCY RECEIVES LAND AT EAST PLAINS PRESERVE

Date: 030914
From: 609-735-2200

NATURE CONSERVANCY RECEIVES LAND DONATION AT EAST PLAINS PRESERVE
LAND GIFT PROTECTS WETLANDS, SAFEGUARDS RARE DAMSELFLY

September 10, 2003

Whitesbog - The Nature Conservancy recently received a generous
donation of nearly 130 acres in Bass River Township, Burlington
County, from Alastair B. Martin which will protect a fragile wetlands
community at East Plains Preserve in the Pine Barrens. The property,
located along the Ives Branch, a tributary to the Wading River, is
adjacent to Bass River State Forest The new addition includes the
pristine waters of the upper Ives Branch, as well as several abandoned
cranberry reservoirs. Here a number of threatened plant and animal
species and natural communities thrive, notably Atlantic white cedar
swamps and a rare damselfly, the Pine Barrens bluet (Enallagma
recurvatum).

"We are pleased to receive this donation from Mr. Martin," said Anne
Heasly, director, Pine Barrens program. "This acquisition is part of
two larger strategies: to protect the headwaters of the Wading River
and to protect undeveloped land south of the East Plains fireshed. The
stream and wetlands on the Martin property act as a natural fire break
and should be protected for ecological fire management purposes."

She added, "We hope this donation will encourage other landowners in
the area to work with the Conservancy to protect their land." "I am
delighted to donate this land to The Nature Conservancy, knowing that
it will help to protect the New Jersey Pine Barrens," said Mr. Martin.

This land donation will help protect a rare damselfly found in the
region. A light blue, narrow-winged damselfly, the Pine Barrens bluet
finds habitat in the wetlands and the occasional ponds and lakes that
dot the Pine Barrens.

"The delicate Pine Barrens bluet damselfly prefers still waters with
vegetation around the edges, and abandoned cranberry reservoirs
provide that ideal habitat," explained Mariana Upmeyer, conservation
planning associate, Pine Barrens program. "The pond on this property
is fed by the waters of the upper Ives Branch, which flows south out
of the East Plains, giving the damselfly found here a relatively clean
water supply."

The Pine Barrens bluet faces a number of threats, including runoff
and groundwater depletion. Damage to shoreline habitat from
recreational use of lakes and ponds also affects its viability.

"Presence of the bluet is a good indicator of the ecological health
of the wetlands found here," said Mariana. "A clean water source has
implications for human residents as well, who depend on the region's
vast underground aquifer for their water supply."
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
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Renee,

I just wish they would included a photo or drawling as to where this property is exactly located.

Guy
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
21,771
3,761
1,093
bruset said:
I read the title of this quickly and thought that they received leeches.
Not quite what it says! :)

Guy