New Book Alert - Privateers of the Revolution: War on the New Jersey Coast, 1775-1783

HeathenClerk

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Mar 25, 2004
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Beachwood
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Howdy all -

I was in Barnes and Noble in Brick last week and did my usual pass-through the New Jersey bookcase, when this book caught my eye. Reading the intro, I immediately bought it with no pre-knowledge of it, and wanted to pass along the word here, having finished it. It's a great addition to shore/pine barrens lore (I have no financial, personal or otherwise connection to this book, company, author, etc, but will be writing a review for my job later this week at Jersey Shore Hurricane News, but wanted to give a head's up here first).

Extensively researched, it's about 320 pages of heavily annotated narrative and another 200-odd pages of appendices, index and aforementioned annotations. Really sews the whole war along the shore, from Delaware Bay to New York Harbor, up nicely (lots on Batsto, Chestnut Neck/Egg Harbor Inlet, Toms River/Huddy/Cranberry Inlet). There are about maybe a dozen word flubs that a proofreader should have caught, and one instance of what should have been a portrait of George Washington wrongly laid out as instead a previous illustration, but nothing at all that isn't easily ignored (and will hopefully be caught and corrected in the future).

Here's a link: http://www.schifferbooks.com/privateers-of-the-revolution-war-on-the-new-jersey-coast-1775-1783-5960.html

And a look at the introduction that caught my eye can be seen at Amazon's "Look Inside" option: https://www.amazon.com/Privateers-Revolution-Jersey-Coast-1775-1783/dp/0764350331

Enjoy!

Erik
 
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Erik:

I acquired the same book on a whim when filling out an Amazon order to qualify for free shipping. I found the same typos, portrait issues, etc., as you. Beyond these minor problems, I found the author lacked a thorough understanding of New Jersey geography and, as a result, the book suffers. I also found the usual annoying error when the author referred to a real estate transaction as a land grant from King George III. The royal reference in the deed is simply an homage to their sovereign, but he never had any involvement in the transaction! It appears the author did not possess a full account of Timothy Shaler, but he does provide some compelling information.

Nonetheless, despite these minor issues, the book and the research conducted to write it will stand in perpetuity as a great reference to the privateers sailing along the coast during the American War for Independence!

Best regards,
Jerseyman
 
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