pine barrens outside of the Pine Barrens

Menantico

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Feb 17, 2013
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Smithville via Vineland, southern pines
When traveling out of South Jersey, especially driving, I take pleasure in noticing the landscape changes; from outer coastal plain, to inner, to piedmont onto mountain. I often bore whichever unlucky passenger happens to be tagging along with the nuance of the elevation changes and differences in flora. That being said, I am still fascinated when I encounter pine barren landscapes outside of the Pine Barrens proper. Maybe it is a feeling of being "home away from home;" regardless I try to make a mental note where I am so I can find it on the map later. Yesterday I was returning from a visit with a friend who lives near Kent Island in MD. I now live in Smithville but I used to live in Gandys Beach and would take rt. 540 from the Delaware Memorial Bridge back down to the Bay. I decided to do so again and take the long way around Down Jersey and forgot about the area just south of Alloway that is absolutely pine barrens even though it is outside of the defined borders. It is mostly oak dominated, but there are some stately pines that flank the roadway and meander into the interior. This specific area is on Telegraph Rd. between Pecks Corner, Marlboro, and Cohansey. I have noticed on some maps of the pines that there are areas outside of the legal term that are in fact pine barrens (geologically, florally, etc.). I think I've read somewhere that these are called "exjunct" areas but a simple search has provided nothing of substance. I suppose this post is an effort to see if I am the only one who feels this way; and more importantly, if not, which are some of your favorite "outside of the pine barrens" barrens?
 
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Boyd

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This specific area is on Telegraph Rd. between Pecks Corner, Marlboro, and Cohansey.
Is this the area you're talking about?

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#14/39.5319/-75.3460/pinesHD

Have been through there a number of times, but not recently. I like that part of the state, but the terrain looks a lot more "bumpy" than the pines.

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#15/39.5319/-75.3460/lidarHD

There are actually more pines than I remembered. :)

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#17/39.53192/-75.34595/pinesLC
 
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Jon Holcombe

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I've posted some about Dix WMA and have done a little exploring around the Cohansey watershed. I thought the area beautiful, primitive, unspoiled and relatively unpopulated. I would love to shoot more down there, and someday I might once I've exhausted the Pinelands National Reserve (which may be never). Oscar Wilde said “The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is young.” I take that to mean, so much to do, too little time.
 

Menantico

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Feb 17, 2013
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Smithville via Vineland, southern pines
Is this the area you're talking about?

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#14/39.5319/-75.3460/pinesHD

Have been through there a number of times, but not recently. I like that part of the state, but the terrain looks a lot more "bumpy" than the pines.

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#15/39.5319/-75.3460/lidarHD

There are actually more pines than I remembered. :)

https://online.boydsmaps.com/#17/39.53192/-75.34595/pinesLC

Yea there certainly are more elevation changes, and I'm guessing that's why it's "barren" in that area. Seems as though the higher spots are capped and acidic and the lower elevations are swampy and still have that southwestern NJ flora.
 
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Menantico

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manumuskin

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Menantico I know that area well and have found quite a few stones back there and I know a few boulders of quite large size laying on the surface near old trench mines from back in pick and shovel days.I"m talking tons here. If you like out of state Barrens some I"ve been to are Fire Islans off of Long Island NY and there are really awesome Piney areas on Cape Cod as well as a Pine Barres strip on top of Back Mountain in WV and some nice areas on Assateague/Chincoteague Island but the most awesome out of state Barrens I"ve ever had the pleasure to visit would be in the Shawangunks of NY. Sams Point Preserve and Minewaska State parks. Talk about "Barrens on the Rocks"! They set on pure white conglomerate that weathers into coarse white sand ,rougher then sugar sand. I have pics on the computer some where. and there are some nice glacial lakes scattered through them and one very nice falls called Verderkeer or something like that. also some ice Barrens areas atop some PA ridges,one area i have yet to visit called "The Barrens" is in western PA out by Somerset.
 

46er

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Have been through there a number of times, but not recently. I like that part of the state, but the terrain looks a lot more "bumpy" than the pines.
Take a ride down RT532 between Chatsworth and RT72. You will think you are on a roller coaster.
 

Teegate

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Take a ride down RT532 between Chatsworth and RT72. You will think you are on a roller coaster.

It also does strange things to the road. I can feel it in the steering wheel.
 

amf

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There even used to be some cranberry bogs in the Pecks Corner area. I believe one of the earliest cultivated bogs in the state was from down that way.
 
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Spung-Man

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But you don't need to be a geologist to note the difference between these two places. ;)
Darn it Boyd, why did you put that wink emoji! That is more compelling than a double dog dare from Jeresyman. The high points in both landscapes are old river bottoms where gravel deposited or ironstone formed. They are the East Coast equivalents of buttes out West:


The soil character difference between the two places can in-part can be attributed to each site’s surfacial deposit age, and each site’s soil enhancement due to its proximity to the Delaware River. The underlying surfacial deposits around Burden Hill are younger and less weathered (less worn out) than the underlying surficial deposits around Chatsworth. Importantly—at the surface where the plants grow—in both places windblown deposits of Ice Age sand cap their underlying surficial deposit.

During the Ice Age, the Delaware River carried vast quantities of desert silt called loess, which blew off the Delaware River terrace after the spring flood but before the terrace surface froze again after a brief summer. Burden Hill is close enough to catch the heavier wind-carried silt as the dust settled out. Chatsworth was too far from the Delaware River silt source to receive a significant quantity of the soil-enriching loess, hence its relatively poorer soil.

S-M
 

c1nj

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Nov 19, 2008
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What I find confusing is the vegetation along Rt. 55 in Millville and Vineland. The soil is nearly as sandy as Chatsworth yet the forest type is different. Less pine and more stunted hardwoods.
 
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Boyd

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manumuskin

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There are some Nature Conservancy areas and State areas on High ground along the upper Maurice that are quite Piney indeed as well as certain areas along the Menantico as well. Our Barrens areas down here that we have left are smaller then the core but still quite Barren none the less.
 
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