Portuguese man-of-war washes ashore in Wildwood Crest

The Wick

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Mar 6, 2016
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That thing is pretty ugly looking. I wouldn't want to swim near that! My kids got stung by some jellyfish the other day swimming in Ocean Gate, The area was red and bothered them for about a 1/2 hour.
 
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manumuskin

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My Mom pulled me over to the lifeguard and asked Him what to do for it.He said put isopropyl alcohol on it.She said give me some.He said we don't have any.Mom flipped a biscuit.I learned a few new words that day.Mom is an excellent educator.
 

bobpbx

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My Mom pulled me over to the lifeguard and asked Him what to do for it.He said put isopropyl alcohol on it.She said give me some.He said we don't have any.Mom flipped a biscuit.I learned a few new words that day.Mom is an excellent educator.
It's supposed to be white vinegar! I found this in Corson's inlet when vacationing in Ocean City in 2016. Think this is one? Big as my head.
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46er

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Mar 24, 2004
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My kids got stung by some jellyfish the other day swimming in Ocean Gate, The area was red and bothered them for about a 1/2 hour.
There are 2 kinds of jellies in the bay this year; Sea Nettles which have been around for some time and the new ones, Clinging Jellyfish. Both sting. This stuff works very well and is used by bay research folks, pretty expensive, depends on how much pain I guess.

http://stingnomore.com/

Save Barnegat Bay has info on the jellies in the bay.

Some first aid suggestions;

The following therapy is recommended for all unidentified jellyfish and other creatures with stinging cells:

  1. If the sting is believed to be from the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) [Steinberg note: not found in Chesapeake Bay], immediately flood the wound with vinegar (5 % acetic acid). Keep the injured person as still as possible. Continuously apply the vinegar until the individual can be brought to medical attention. If you are out at sea or on an isolated beach, allow the vinegar to soak the tentacles or stung skin for 10 minutes before attempting to remove adherent tentacles or to further treat the wound. In Australia, surf lifesavers (lifeguards) may carry antivenin, which is given as an intramuscular injection.
  2. For all other stings, if a topical decontaminant (e.g., vinegar, isopropyl [rubbing] alcohol, one-quarter-strength household ammonia, or baking soda) is available, apply it liberally onto the skin. If it is a liquid, continuously soak a compress. (Be advised that some authorities advise against the use of alcohol because of scientific evaluations that have revealed that some nematocysts discharge because of this chemical's application.) Since not all jellyfish are identical, it is extremely helpful to know ahead of time what works for the stingers in your specific geographic location.

    Apply the decontaminant for 30 minutes or until pain is relieved. A paste made from unseasoned meat tenderizer (do not exceed 15 minutes' application time, particularly on the sensitive skin of small children) or papaya fruit may be helpful. Concentrated citrus (e.g., lime) juice may be helpful. Do not apply any organic solvent, such as kerosene, turpentine, or gasoline.

    Until the decontaminant is available, you may rinse the skin with sea water. Do not simply rinse the skin gently with fresh water or apply ice directly to the skin. A brisk freshwater stream (forceful shower) may have sufficient force to physically remove the microscopic stinging cells, but non-forceful application is more likely to cause the cells to fire, increasing the envenomation. A non-moist ice or cold pack may be useful to diminish pain, but take care to wipe away any surface moisture (condensation) prior to the application.
  3. After decontamination, apply a lather of shaving cream or soap and shave the affected area with a razor. In a pinch, you can use a paste of sand or mud in sea water and a clamshell.
  4. Reapply the primary decontaminant for 15 minutes.
  5. Apply a thin coating of hydrocortisone lotion (0.5 to 1 percent) twice a day. Anesthetic ointment (such as lidocaine hydrochloride 2.5 percent or a benzocaine-containing spray) may provide short-term pain relief.
  6. If the victim has a large area involved (entire arm or leg, face, or genitals), is very young or very old, or shows signs of generalized illness (nausea, vomiting, weakness, shortness of breath or chest pain), seek help from a doctor. If a person has placed tentacle fragments in his mouth, have him swish and spit whatever potable liquid is available. If there is already swelling in the mouth (muffled voice, difficulty swallowing, enlarged tongue and lips), do not give anything by mouth, protect the airway and rapidly transport the victim to a hospital.
There are also Stingrays in the bay. This one caught in a researchers seine net. Nice barb on it.

 

manumuskin

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Jul 20, 2003
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There are 2 kinds of jellies in the bay this year; Sea Nettles which have been around for some time and the new ones, Clinging Jellyfish. Both sting. This stuff works very well and is used by bay research folks, pretty expensive, depends on how much pain I guess.

http://stingnomore.com/

Save Barnegat Bay has info on the jellies in the bay.

Some first aid suggestions;
My Dad used to pull the barb out when he caught them and use them for tooth picks.He never kept them.I think their good eating.They use skate meat to fake scallops.I like them both.


There are also Stingrays in the bay. This one caught in a researchers seine net. Nice barb on it.

 

NJChileHead

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Dec 22, 2011
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It's supposed to be white vinegar! I found this in Corson's inlet when vacationing in Ocean City in 2016. Think this is one? Big as my head.
View attachment 10784
Bob that looks kind of symmetrical to be a man-of-war. I was originally thinking that it was a lion's mane jellyfish because of the size and symmetry but lion's manes have very long tentacles. I did some research and it looks like your jellyfish is one called a mushroom cap.
 
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bobpbx

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Bob that looks kind of symmetrical to be a man-of-war. I was originally thinking that it was a lion's mane jellyfish because of the size and symmetry but lion's manes have very long tentacles. I did some research and it looks like your jellyfish is one called a mushroom cap.
It did bother me that I did not see hanging tentacles.
 

46er

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This is a man-o-war; one of several washed up on IBSP a couple years ago; happened th past couple of years and written up in the local papers. They get a bit beat up and lose most of the tentacles coming thru the surf. Still not a good idea to touch 'em.

 

NJChileHead

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Dec 22, 2011
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This is a man-o-war; one of several washed up on IBSP a couple years ago; happened th past couple of years and written up in the local papers. They get a bit beat up and lose most of the tentacles coming thru the surf. Still not a good idea to touch 'em.

Those tentacles look just like seaweed! :D
 
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