Super Beaver Moon coming

Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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My point and shoot is not really good for taking low light shots.


IMG_0642a.jpg
 

46er

Piney
Mar 24, 2004
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I stepped outside to take a look; had too, probably my last chance unless we see a major change in our longevity. It is noticeably brighter, but I wouldn't leave a warm house for long to see it ;)
 

Teegate

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It is nice to see but nothing special as you say.
 

manumuskin

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Jul 20, 2003
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They always rave about these close moons but when you talking a few thousand miles closer over an average distance of 250,000 mi a few thousand isn't going to make the moon appear noticeably larger.If you had really accurate instruments you could measure it.Probably be a few minutes larger,the apparent diameter of the moon is One half degree same as the sun.Every one gets hyped up about these Super Moons and i hear them talk about how big the moon was but I think they expected it to be bigger so in their mind it was.They probably don't look at the moon till they hear it's SUPER!
 

manumuskin

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Jul 20, 2003
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By the way the moon is moving further away every year,by several feet a year and nothing suggesting this has ever reversed.Only a few million years ago it would have been touching the earth.So much for a 4 billion year old solar system.
 

RednekF350

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Feb 20, 2004
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Just in case I don't make it to 2034, I stepped outside at 5:30 this morning to have a look.
The size seemed a little larger than normal but the brightness was remarkable.
But what am I thinkin' ?
Just like Billy Joe Shaver, I'm gonna live forever !
 
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manumuskin

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Jul 20, 2003
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I"ll be 70 in 2034. I have arthritis in my ankles and feet and one shoulder still painful after a rotator cuff operation five years ago and the other shoulder has been pulled six months ago and hurts worse then the other one and may need an operation eventually but my doctor told me at my past physical that i have the heart of a 30 year old so I expect to live a long and painful life.I"ll be here in 34 but may not be able to crawl outside to see it:)
 

RednekF350

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Feb 20, 2004
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I"ll be 70 in 2034. I have arthritis in my ankles and feet and one shoulder still painful after a rotator cuff operation five years ago and the other shoulder has been pulled six months ago and hurts worse then the other one and may need an operation eventually but my doctor told me at my past physical that i have the heart of a 30 year old so I expect to live a long and painful life.I"ll be here in 34 but may not be able to crawl outside to see it:)
I'll give you a drag out the door Al !
I am actually developing arthritis in a couple of my toes. At least that's my diagnosis using internet resources, which, by the way, are far more accessible than most doctors !
I cured my Plantar's fasciitis using a YouTube video and I've been a fan ever since.

I am actually pissed that something is actually starting to bother me at 58.
But I do take my meds daily ! :guinness:
 

piker56

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Jan 13, 2006
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Let's see, born in 1956, next super moon is 2034? I'll be 78. Nobody in my family has made it to 70 yet (on my dad's side). On my mom's side, it's dementia by their late 60's. I plan on being around for awhile, but 78 may be a stretch. I wake up and see green grass, I'm on the right side and it's a good day. I wake up and see roots..........
 
Apr 6, 2004
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Galloway
By the way the moon is moving further away every year,by several feet a year and nothing suggesting this has ever reversed.Only a few million years ago it would have been touching the earth.So much for a 4 billion year old solar system.
Al, did you think I'd give you a pass on this? Show us the math.;)
 

RednekF350

Piney
Feb 20, 2004
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I was referring to his young earth creationist argument. Let's see them numbers!
I know, I was trying to deflect you a little Gabe. :)
There is not enough time left in this world to argue the points of creationism vs science nor do I have an interest in doing so.

I am a fairly educated and scientifically minded person and I still cannot accept statements such as these from the article:

"It is thought that the Moon was formed when a proto-planet about the size of Mars collided with the early Earth around 4.5bn years ago. The debris left over from impact coalesced to form the Moon. Computer simulations of such an impact are consistent with the Earth Moon system we see in the 21st Century."


The leaps and bounds taken to come up with that hypothesis based on computer simulations generated using extrinsic data are just too huge for me. The randomness and coalescence of space debris resulting in the formation the moon, which has an orbit and which exerts forces on our tidal oceans, is just as crazy sounding as creationism in my opinion.

Perhaps the truth is somewhere in between.
Only one thing is certain, you and I will never have the Answer.
 
Apr 6, 2004
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Galloway
I know, I was trying to deflect you a little Gabe. :)
There is not enough time left in this world to argue the points of creationism vs science nor do I have an interest in doing so.

I am a fairly educated and scientifically minded person and I still cannot accept statements such as these from the article:

"It is thought that the Moon was formed when a proto-planet about the size of Mars collided with the early Earth around 4.5bn years ago. The debris left over from impact coalesced to form the Moon. Computer simulations of such an impact are consistent with the Earth Moon system we see in the 21st Century."


The leaps and bounds taken to come up with that hypothesis based on computer simulations generated using extrinsic data are just too huge for me. The randomness and coalescence of space debris resulting in the formation the moon, which has an orbit and which exerts forces on our tidal oceans, is just as crazy sounding as creationism in my opinion.

Perhaps the truth is somewhere in between.
Only one thing is certain, you and I will never have the Answer.
To be fair, astrophysicists do not claim the Giant Impact hypothesis to be fact. Perhaps one day science will be able to determine the truth of the matter, perhaps not. If you care to, can you explain why the hypothesis sounds crazy to you? Certainly, the scientists that ascribe to this hypothesis are well aware of the nature of the moon's orbit and is influence on earth's tides.