Toyota 4runner

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,385
2,599
Pines; Bamber area
I took off the spare and back bumper, and then wire brushed and put rust restorer on the back frame and then a top coat, but when I went to hang the spare, I heard something sloshing around in the spare when I rolled it. Took it in for someone to take it apart and look at it, but they immediately knew it was 'balance beads'. I never even knew about them.

balance bead inside the wheel - Google Search
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,385
2,599
Pines; Bamber area
I got the front bumper off and built ramps for all 4 wheels. It gives me 4 1/2 inches more to scoot around under there taking care of some rust. It doesn't sound like a lot, but it really is.

I also found the leaking transmission cooling lines. They are both leaking right in front of the transmission. Something I'm wondering about is how to ensure the transmission is topped off after fixing those lines. I can't see any filler port like on the older vehicles and could not find anything in the manual to even check it.
 

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Zach McGarvey

Explorer
Feb 11, 2018
246
166
34
Woodbury / Vineland NJ
Transmissions today don't have dipsticks. You have to fill them through a fill port, until it overflows out of an inspection port, at a specific internal temperature that you read with a scan tool. Some would say reading the pan temperature is close enough. I tend to agree. For most any Toyota it would be 95-104F. Any hotter it would be underfilled, any cooler it would be over.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,385
2,599
Pines; Bamber area
Transmissions today don't have dipsticks. You have to fill them through a fill port, until it overflows out of an inspection port, at a specific internal temperature that you read with a scan tool. Some would say reading the pan temperature is close enough. I tend to agree. For most any Toyota it would be 95-104F. Any hotter it would be underfilled, any cooler it would be over.

I did look at youtube and got the real deal, yeah. I decided to have the shop do it, so that's done. They also replaced the axles, and also drained and refilled differential and transfer case. I did an oil change (twice), cabin and air filter, and topped off all fluids. Next is rear brakes, and then scrap the X-reas suspension system and replace with a normal one. I want to do a mild lift, 1 or 2".

Zach, I like to know what that metal screen type of filter is just downstream from the air filter. Why would that never have to be changed? Looks like it's not replaceable.
 

Zach McGarvey

Explorer
Feb 11, 2018
246
166
34
Woodbury / Vineland NJ
I did look at youtube and got the real deal, yeah. I decided to have the shop do it, so that's done. They also replaced the axles, and also drained and refilled differential and transfer case. I did an oil change (twice), cabin and air filter, and topped off all fluids. Next is rear brakes, and then scrap the X-reas suspension system and replace with a normal one. I want to do a mild lift, 1 or 2".

Zach, I like to know what that metal screen type of filter is just downstream from the air filter. Why would that never have to be changed? Looks like it's not replaceable.

The white mesh screen holds a matrix of charcoal that's designed to block (or retain them, really, until the next time the engine is run) unburned hydrocarbons that may be lingering in the air intake system while the car is off, and prevent their release into the atmosphere. It's intentionally downstream of the air filter, so it should never get dirty. It isn't replaceable but it's easily removed if you so choose.

Use a factory air filter always. The aftermarket ones shed little fibers that foul the mass-airflow sensor.\

Also strongly agree with you on ditching the X-REAS. I do it all the time for customers and nobody ever notices any difference in the ride. Just get the Monroe Quick-Struts for the front, with a small lift spacer, if you want.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,385
2,599
Pines; Bamber area
The white mesh screen holds a matrix of charcoal that's designed to block (or retain them, really, until the next time the engine is run) unburned hydrocarbons that may be lingering in the air intake system while the car is off, and prevent their release into the atmosphere. It's intentionally downstream of the air filter, so it should never get dirty. It isn't replaceable but it's easily removed if you so choose.

Use a factory air filter always. The aftermarket ones shed little fibers that foul the mass-airflow sensor.\

Also strongly agree with you on ditching the X-REAS. I do it all the time for customers and nobody ever notices any difference in the ride. Just get the Monroe Quick-Struts for the front, with a small lift spacer, if you want.

Thanks. I used a Fram I think, so I'll get the OEM one soon. Why would unburned hydrocarbons be in the air intake system? I thought the fresh air intake by the wheel well would not be subject to that.
 

Zach McGarvey

Explorer
Feb 11, 2018
246
166
34
Woodbury / Vineland NJ
Thanks. I used a Fram I think, so I'll get the OEM one soon. Why would unburned hydrocarbons be in the air intake system? I thought the fresh air intake by the wheel well would not be subject to that.

It's unburned fuel that was sprayed from the injectors, intended to be combusted in the engine, but instead migrated backwards (upstream) into the intake. This occurs because many engines use a controlled bit of valve timing overlap to pull some exhaust gas backwards into the intake to lower NOX emissions without the trouble of an EGR valve. With the exhaust gas will come some unburned gasoline.

I would strongly suggest using the OEM filters and fluids exclusively. These are very reliable vehicles and the ones that come in broken normally have had some aftermarket hackery.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,385
2,599
Pines; Bamber area
It's unburned fuel that was sprayed from the injectors, intended to be combusted in the engine, but instead migrated backwards (upstream) into the intake. This occurs because many engines use a controlled bit of valve timing overlap to pull some exhaust gas backwards into the intake to lower NOX emissions without the trouble of an EGR valve. With the exhaust gas will come some unburned gasoline.

I would strongly suggest using the OEM filters and fluids exclusively. These are very reliable vehicles and the ones that come in broken normally have had some aftermarket hackery.

Okay, will do. Thanks for the info.
 

Ben Ruset

Administrator
Site Administrator
Oct 12, 2004
7,435
1,378
Monmouth County
www.benruset.com
Bob, you're brave buying a dark color vehicle for the pines.

Granted, that's what I usually had too.

I've been looking at Jeep Cherokees (2001 and older) and it's amazing that people want $5000+ for one that's at least 20 years old.
 

enormiss

Explorer
Aug 18, 2015
324
150
Atco NJ
An XJ, the boxy one? That was my first jeep
Just scrapped my daughters 02 grand after taking parts for my TJ
250,000mi and rust I just got tired of maintenance
 
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Ben Ruset

Administrator
Site Administrator
Oct 12, 2004
7,435
1,378
Monmouth County
www.benruset.com
An XJ, the boxy one? That was my first jeep
Just scrapped my daughters 02 grand after taking parts for my TJ
250,000mi and rust I just got tired of maintenance

Yes, one of the boxy ones. I had a 90 and loved it. I don't think I'd get an obnoxious roof rack like I used to have again. What was I thinking?

That thing was super reliable except for the power window switches. After I replaced the radiator and coolant expansion tank. :)

I'd like to find a 98-01.

DSCF0006.jpg


This Jeep cost me $2k in 2003.
 

Ben Ruset

Administrator
Site Administrator
Oct 12, 2004
7,435
1,378
Monmouth County
www.benruset.com
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