Cumberland furnace

Discussion in 'Ghost Towns and Forgotten Places' started by bach2yoga, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Sawmill

    Located on the south side of route 49 below Cumberland Pond. Probably first built ca. 1800 or shortly thereafter following construction of the iron furnace. There probably were two mills, the last operated by Sam Cameron until 1915.
    Early maps ca. 1820-1830 show three raceways at this location, although an 1831 map of Eli Budd's lands indicates only one. There is no question that the westernmost raceway served the furnace but maps differ on where the saw and grist mills were located.
    A ca. 1820 map shows the furnace and an unidentified structure on the westernmost raceway. Two ca. 1830 maps show the furnace and unidentified structures on the 2 other raceways. The 1831 Budd map depicts the furnace and an unidentified structure west of a single raceway. An insert from the 1862 Pomeroy map of Cumberland County is even more vague. The furnace, gristmill and a store are west of the one raceway but too far away for the locations to be accurate. An 1876 Stewart's Atlas insert shows one raceway with a store and sawmill on the west side of the creek itself and an unidentified structure on the east side of the single raceway.
    The furnace and grist mill ceased to operate about 1840 and it is possible that by 1862 the raceways had started to fill and were dry. A possible explanation of the differing map information may be that the grist mill was closed but still standing in 1862 and an early sawmill, probably on the first raceway had closed in 1862 but another was operating by 1876.
    An undated newspaper clipping published by the Vineland Historical Society, a sales pitch to sell land in the Cumberland area, mentions a grist mill already erected on the lower dam and a saw mill, with machinery for planing and matching, soon to be running. It does not say the grist mill is operating, merely that it is there. Other statements in the ad place its publication at ca. 1870.
    Both Otto and Cumberland resident Tom Brown recall that water for the Cameron saw mill was channeled though a cedar trough under the old iron bridge on Route 49. The bridge was replaced and the sites of the sawmill and a small store were obliterated when the highway was widened about 1930, they say.

    _Jean Jones, Conservation Plan for the Manumuskin River Watershed
  2. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Grist mill

    Budd's grist mill is said to have been built at about the same time as the furnace, ca. 1800, south of the present Route 49 and Cumberland pond. The mill was built by Eli Budd and reportedly shut down at app. the same time as the furnace, about 1840.

    Two millstones from this mill were kept in the yard of the large, old house east of the creek and south of Route 49. This house is shown on an 1831 map as being the home of Wesley Budd, son of Eli. The stones were purchased by the Fox family in the 1940s. There may be subsurface remains of the mill if they were not destroyed by highway reconstruction.

    -Jean Jones, Conservation Plan for the Manumuskin River Watershed
  3. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Raceways

    Budd's sawmill-probably the easternmost raceway shown on the old maps depicting 3 raceways at Cumberland furnace. This is also probably the dry raceway which still can be found west of the creek.

    Budd's grist mill. If this raceway is extant, it would lie within the swamp between the present creek course and the iron furnace raceway, west of the creek.

    Eli Budd's iron furnace raceway. The westernmost raceway of the three. Although all maps show this raceway leaving Cumberland Pond at the western end of the dam, longtime area residents all say that the very slight depression west of the pond is the course of the raceway and that it left the pond at a point to the north, where the bank curves westward toward Union Road, and was easily discernable 50 yrs ago. A catch basin has been dug where this raceway crossed present Route 49. It is located app. 319 feet east of the Union Road intersection and about 16 feet east of a concrete marker north of the highway. In Aug. 1987 after an extended drought, the course of the raceway could be seen as an area where the grass was noticeably greener. It was probably deliberately filled, as the raceway outside the disturbed area south of Rt 49 is still fairly deep.

    HW Banaman has suggested that a better surge of water might have been obtained by tapping into the pond above the point where the creek channel and two other raceways drew water from it. This raceway can be found south of the distrubed area along Rt 49 and followed to the furnace ruins.

    -Jean Jones, Conservation Plan for the Manumuskin River Watershed
  4. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Dams and Bridges

    Wesley Budd's forge dam. About 1 mile above the Cumberland furnace dam. Forge Avenue crossed this dam. An earthen dam, it provided pondage for an iron forge built here ca. 1810. The road crossing the dam and other roads in the area are built of slag from the iron furnace.

    Cumberland furnace dam. Rt 49 crosses this dam. Probably built ca. 1800 or earlier to provide power for the iron furnace and saw and grist mills. The 1894 Geological Survey of NJ reports a nine foot fall, giving 3.16 horsepower per foot fall for nine months of the year. Only the sawmill was operating here at that time.

    Bridge across the dam at rt 49, Cumberland Rd.. The present bridge replaces an earlier steel bridge, which probably was the succesor to a series of wooden bridges. The steel bridge was replaced when Rt 49 was widened to accomodate traffic about 1929.

    Lawrens Branch bridge, a small wooden bridge which crosses over the dam east of Cumberland pond.

    Forge Avenue Bridge-several bridges have been built here, the earliest to accomodate wagons and later automobiles. The last two bridges have been for pedestrian use only. The present bridge consist of two telephone poles with pallets nailed across them. The pallets have been removed from the western end of the bridge.

    -Jean Jones, Conservation Plan for the Manumuskin River Watershed
  5. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Survey Stone and Roads

    exists at Cumberland, west of Port Elizabeth Cumberland Rd, south of Rte 49, a Society corner. Also called Quarry Hill corner on some maps. This is a corner marker for the West Jersey Society of Proprieters.

    Port Elizabeth Cumberland Rd, also called at various times the Road to Budd's Mill, Road to Budd's Furnace, and where it passed near the Eagle Glass Works, Glasstown Road. Built in 1800.

    Forge Avenue crossed the forge dam and joined other roads east of the creek at Budd's forge. Also extended a short distance west of Union Road. Ca. 1810

    Schooner Landing Road Led from Cumberland furnace to Schooner landing south of Clarks Pond on Menantico Creek, where ore was brought in for the Cumberland blast furnace and iron and possibly wood shipped out.The road was probably built at about the same time as the furnace, ca. 1800.

    -Jean Jones, Conservation Plan for the Manumuskin River Watershed
  6. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Iron Works

    Located south of Rte 49 between old Schooner Landing Rd and the west bank of the Manumuskin.
    Eli Budd moved to this area from Burlington in 1785 and, ca. 1810 built a blast furnace for the manufacture of iron from bog ore. Although the Budd family lost the iron works in 1819 after financial problems, the furnace continued to be operated by a succession of owners until about 1840. By this time all the wood had been cut from the large tracts affiliated with the furnace cutting off the cheap supply of charcoal. There also was competition with other areas where anthracite coal had come into use and there was a supply of better quality ore. The Budds at one time owned 22000 acres of land in conjunction with the furnace and an iron forge built at an earlier date.

    Wesley Budd's forge, located about 1 mile upstream from the furnace. Twenty years ago it was easily accessible but in 1987 part of the bridge has been removed on the east side of the creek and the forge site is accessble from the west only by way of sand roads of very poor quality--Barry, which means that you were correct that the building we visited was probably too new to be the forge.

    There is a lot of other info in this book about the furnace and forges, but for various reasons I won't go into all of it.
    I will post one more later on the church and cemetery.

    Renee
  7. Piney1125 New Member

    Member Since:
    May 1, 2004
    Location:
    Cherry Hill, NJ
    I saw that you made a photo album of "Filling in Cumberland Furnace". What happened to it? Where was it? Is there anything left of it?
  8. bach2yoga Guest

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  9. BEHR655 New Member

    Member Since:
    Feb 19, 2003
    Location:
    Merchantville, NJ
    Ummm.................. I think he may mean the furnace. :rolleyes:
  10. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    That is the furnace, there are 3 pages.
  11. Piney1125 New Member

    Member Since:
    May 1, 2004
    Location:
    Cherry Hill, NJ
    Is the furnace still covered in logs and dirt?
  12. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    It had better be!
    Renee
  13. rpwoolford New Member

    Member Since:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Location:
    Millville, NJ
    I've enjoyed reading all about the old furnace at Cumberland Pond.

    Can anyone tell me where Old Schooner Landing Rd is/was? I know where the current Schooner Landing Rd is, not sure if it still does, but at one time it joined in with Fries Mill Rd (which may or may not be a paved road). It can be found on a map, but in all my years growing up and living in Port Elizabeth and Millville, I don't recall ever seeing it in my travels. Kinda funny in a way.

    Robb
  14. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    Robb,
    I just loaned out my old maps of the area. I'll be picking them up in a couple of weeks, and I can scan one then and put it in my album. ITMT, Kendawg I think has a copy of some of the maps, maybe he can tell. I'll look around and see if I have any other copies around, and if I do I'll let you know.
    Renee
  15. rpwoolford New Member

    Member Since:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Location:
    Millville, NJ
    Thanks Renee.

    I am thinking that it is a road that was broken, destroyed or just forgotten when 55 was built in the 60s.

    Robb
  16. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    I think you may be correct, but I'd like to check my maps before I place my bets on it.
    Renee
  17. BEHR655 New Member

    Member Since:
    Feb 19, 2003
    Location:
    Merchantville, NJ
    Looking at a current topo map I can find Schooner Landing Rd. I also can see what may be Old Schooner Landing Rd. That area is private property. Looking at Cook's Atlas from 1890 I do not see either road on it.

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  18. bach2yoga Guest

    Member Since:
    There are a few roads on the old map, including Old Cape May Road behind the furnace and a few others that my maps show that I don't see on either of those. But the location you've pointed out looks plausible to me...
  19. KenDawg New Member

    Member Since:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Location:
    South Jersey
    Behr,
    Thanks for posting the maps. I'd like to take a look at the Cook's atlas of that area sometime soon.
    Ken
  20. manumuskin Piney

    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Location:
    millville nj
    fries mill road is still there.it"s now a private blacktop drive at port cumberland road and leads into what used to be camp hollybrook and now nature conservancy.once tyou get to the bridge over manumuskin creek it turns dirt.passes a house ruin and then is destroyed by a blue hole shown on the map.it used to connect with schooner landing road long ago.potter cabin ruins are just south of it

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