Archery Opens Statewide Oct. 3, 2009

GermanG

Piney
Apr 2, 2005
1,028
282
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Little Egg Harbor
OK, my comment was probably off-base. I knew it would spark-up the conversation, but probably would have been better off not saying it. Anyway, I don't want to take the thread off-topic or risk it being closed, so to the OP, I appologize.
I actually enjoy threads where there is a bit of passionate disagreement, as long as it stays respectful. There is nothing better than a group of people who can disagree, even seriously, on a subject but be as good friends as ever when the topic moves on.


Regarding my comments on inline muzzleloaders, my biggest complaint about the newer technology is that it brings much larger crowds of hunters into the woods during a season that was once the domain of a smaller group of dedicated hunters who had a respect and interest in historic weapons and were willing to deal with the disadvantages of the older technology. Muzzleloaders which have sealed, weatherproof ignition systems, use pelletized powder loads and have modern sight systems have little if any disadvantage compared to a shotgun. The original intention was to give users of traditional weapons a season of their own. Part of the problem is that the Division of Fish & Wildlife is a largely self funded agency and relies on licenses and fees to operate. As the state becomes more and more urbanized and hunter numbers decline, I feel the Division grasps at any opportunity to sell more licenses and permits.
 

foofoo

Explorer
Sep 14, 2003
183
0
16
Regarding my comments on inline muzzleloaders, my biggest complaint about the newer technology is that it brings much larger crowds of hunters into the woods during a season that was once the domain of a smaller group of dedicated hunters who had a respect and interest in historic weapons and were willing to deal with the disadvantages of the older technology.
the number of new hunters are on the decline. last i read was for every 100 hunters that pass on theres only 70 to replace them. in the early seventies opening day of bow hunting in the pines had the parking areas full of hunters. today i hunt mostly by myself and dont see many others out there. i doubt if crossbows and inline muzzleloaders will matter much. liberal bag limits and seasons will do more damage. this state has a permit for every little sneeze and we hunters just keep paying up. crossbows arent guns and modern flintlocks and caplock muzzleloaders have the advantages of the best powders ,bullets , and primers that our pioneer forefathers didnt have. is it just bragging rights to say i did it the hard way or real mans way of hunting? i dont understand why what some think is a challenging way to hunt should be the same for all ... i mean where do you draw the line. the cave man drove game off cliffs and used sticks and rocks to hunt with. now thats a challenge.i enjoy my flinter as well as my sabot throwing inline . theres still a challenge in scouting and getting close. it only takes a split second to pull the trigger. as long as the game is harvested cleanly and quick by a hunter that is proficient with his weapon i could care less what they use.in some areas in the pines the deer herd is way down. i feel its part of a perfect storm of a bad luck cycle for the pines. the state hasnt plant the feed strips for many years now ( they so -no money). the coyotes have exploded. a couple years ago the gysy moths made the woods bare. liberal seasons and the greedy state all adds up to poor quality deer in the pines.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
21,998
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the number of new hunters are on the decline. last i read was for every 100 hunters that pass on theres only 70 to replace them.

a couple years ago the gysy moths made the woods bare. liberal seasons and the greedy state all adds up to poor quality deer in the pines.
I have to agree with you. I rarely run into hunters during the season and rarely see deer. I see more along 295 and the side roads near my house than in the pines.

Guy
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
11,449
2,073
1,093
Pines; Bamber area
I have to agree with you. I rarely run into hunters during the season and rarely see deer. I see more along 295 and the side roads near my house than in the pines.Guy
I agree with Guy. And if Guy and I see less deer, then there are less deer to be seen.
 

RednekF350

Piney
Feb 20, 2004
4,312
1,827
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Pestletown, N.J.
I agree with Guy. And if Guy and I see less deer, then there are less deer to be seen.
You two ain't seeing deer because they don't look like stones or weeds.
:D

Actually deer harvest figures statewide have been steady the past several years. There are some exceptions though, like my zone 23 where there have been declines.
If you look back into the early 70's when I was a young hunting lad, the numbers of deer killed has jumped dramatically.
Here are the stats:

http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/deerharvestsummary.htm

I got my first license in 1968 at the age of 10 and I don't think I saw a deer until I was 13.
My early deer hunting trips from those years consisted of sitting with my dad behind a tree along the edge of the Bulltown rye strips and praying a forlorn deer would walk out in the open during the middle of shotgun.
My father didn't know much about deer hunting but he sure made sure we went every year. I have learned a lot since those days and I surely miss those times with him. He died 12 years ago with Alzheimer's.
Yesterday he would have turned 90.

The popularity of hunting has declined but this article reports a slight bump up in license sales due to the crapped out economy.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,465144,00.html

I know that hunting and fishing fill my freezer every year and this year, we will appreciaite it even more.

Scott
 

ecampbell

Piney
Jan 2, 2003
2,512
567
1,093
This is the second year in a row that I have rarely seen deer in the pines, and I am out every day. Hunters are also rare. However there are many deer around the farms in Tabernacle.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
21,998
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You two ain't seeing deer because they don't look like stones or weeds.
:D
You going to take that Bob? He called mine what they are, but your plants he called weeds. Them are fighting words!

Seriously, in the early part of this decade Jessica and I would run into 25 or more dear each time we were out, and now I can go a month without seeing them. A few weeks back we did spook one up close by us and that is a first in many years.

Guy
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
11,449
2,073
1,093
Pines; Bamber area
You going to take that Bob? He called mine what they are, but your plants he called weeds. Them are fighting words!

Seriously, in the early part of this decade Jessica and I would run into 25 or more dear each time we were out, and now I can go a month without seeing them. A few weeks back we did spook one up close by us and that is a first in many years.

Guy
Twasn't nuthin 15-20 years ago to flush them out with alarming regularity. Since coyotes have moved in they seem scarce.
 

Banjo

Scout
Apr 17, 2005
76
0
6
S.W. Missouri
I remember in Readers Digest, a story about a distance runner who had heard that the indians would run down deer on foot and kill them with a blade when they tired out. He took an apple with him instead of a knife and tried to run one down. I think it took him a couple miles, but the deer finally tired from his constant running. The guy was able to hand feed the deer and then run back home. That would be a challenge. If one could do it, what season would that come under?
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
11,449
2,073
1,093
Pines; Bamber area
I remember in Readers Digest, a story about a distance runner who had heard that the indians would run down deer on foot and kill them with a blade when they tired out. He took an apple with him instead of a knife and tried to run one down. I think it took him a couple miles, but the deer finally tired from his constant running. The guy was able to hand feed the deer and then run back home. That would be a challenge. If one could do it, what season would that come under?
The silly season.
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
28
Bamber Lake
Been in the woods with the pup almost everyday around dusk for a few hours. It's a rare day when I dont see any deer. I've seen hunters too, but not as many as one might expect.
 

Hewey

Piney
Mar 10, 2005
1,040
100
1,043
Pinewald, NJ
I've seen hunters too, but not as many as one might expect.
I have noticed this also, The same trucks I used to see in the areas I hunt are no longer there. I think some of the hunters that traveled into the pines to hunt are now going to other areas with more deer, The harvest numbers have been real low the last few years in the pines. I love to sit in my treestand in the pines on a crisp fall morning and watch the woods come alive. The deer are just a bonus. I have hunted other places in jersey and it just does not feel as good as hunting in the pines.
 

wis bang

Explorer
Jun 24, 2004
235
1
18
East Windsor
I live near Assinpink WMU and I've been seeing a fair number of parked cars. Alot of guys park after work and hunt till dark on weekdays.

I have to agree w/ Germaine about 'modern' muzzleloaders. I hunt in PA w/ a rifle but I do carry a flintlock during october's anterless muzzleloader week as well as the primitive [flintlock only] season after Christmas. Nothing smells like a cloud of black powder...