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RednekF350

Piney
Feb 20, 2004
4,778
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Pestletown, N.J.
So, for those hunters in those zones, are they hoping people bail out?
Well they are going to stage the refund requests allowing requests to be made for A and B weeks first. A week starts April 20, B week on April 27.
I wouldn't be able to request a refund until D week got closer. I wouldn't ask for the refund anyway. I would rather see the money stay with the Division.
 

RednekF350

Piney
Feb 20, 2004
4,778
2,676
Pestletown, N.J.
Thanks. How often do they measure the population? Does less hunting pressure now make it likely there will be more permits issued later?

Good question. But I don’t know the answer.

When I was in college in 1979 the turkey Program was in its infancy. I had a class in wildlife management at Rutgers and Bob Erickson from Fish and Wildlife gave a presentation on the program. It was very interesting and he demonstrated a rocket net for us showing how they captured the birds from other states and brought them to New Jersey. The first hunting season for turkey was in 1981 Which was the year I graduated. I started seeing birds locally around 82 or 83 in my area. Since then the program has been a very big success.

That class in wildlife management was the best class I ever had in college. Teaching duties were shared by three professors all of them were big-time hunters. We went to each of their homes for wild game barbecues during the semester. And the drinking age was not 21 back then so we were all allowed to bring beer. Life was indeed good !
 
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Good question. But I don’t know the answer.
When I was in college in 1979 the turkey Program was in its infancy. I had a class in wildlife management at Rutgers and Bob Erickson from Fish and Wildlife gave a presentation on the program. It was very interesting and he demonstrated a rocket net for us showing how they captured the birds from other states and brought them to New Jersey.
The first hunting season for turkey was in 1981 Which was the year I graduated. I started seeing birds locally around 82 or 83 in my area. Since then the program has been a very big success.
That class in wildlife management was the best class I ever had in college. Teaching duties were shared by three professors all of them were big-time hunters. We went to each of their homes for wild game barbecues during the semester. And the drinking age was not 21 back then so we were all allowed to bring beer. Life was indeed good !

You were fortunate to get Bob Erickson as a teacher. I only met him briefly at various events. One of the conservation officers back then was Walt Pettigrew; I was friends with Laurie Pettigrew and through her, Walt. One of the generation in which most game wardens were hunters; Walt told me that the newer generation of officers were more likely to have had criminal justice education than biology training.

I was present sometime before 1981 when turkeys from other states were released to repopulate here. In an area near Vineland along Landis Ave, state biologists opened a dozen boxes one by one, each containing a turkey from NY. These birds had been confined for hours, transportd in a truck. We were in an open field, about 100 feet from the woods.

Each bird, when the box was opened, walked out, shook its wings, and launched. Took seconds to get airborne, and then leveled out about 20 feet above ground heading into the trees at impressive speed.
The beginning of my respect for the species. Ben Franklin was right; we should have chosen the wild turkey as our national bird.
 

Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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You were fortunate to get Bob Erickson as a teacher. I only met him briefly at various events. One of the conservation officers back then was Walt Pettigrew; I was friends with Laurie Pettigrew and through her, Walt.

I knew Laurie. She was instrumental in helping Manumuskin and myself in our endeavor's years ago. Jessica, Al and I spent hours on many days in the upstairs rooms of the building she worked at. Had lunch in the gazebo out back one day with her.
 

NJChileHead

Explorer
Dec 22, 2011
803
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I had to gather myself for sometime before responding to this post....

but I understand your concern here..believe me...and I didn't mean to come across in an insensitive way.....you run a great site..and you seem nice enough....

but I lost my older brother to this disease 3 weeks ago, so I don't take this thing lightly....i have nightmares about it and you will notice... I hope... that I didnt suggest that people shouldnt take the utmost precaution when going to the State Parks....Common sense isn't too common, but it goes a long way....I truly believe what I said..that the "solution" will prove to be worse than the virus itself, but for you to suggest that I am therefore devaluing human life is frankly a thoughtless thing to say...ok, I've said my peace. Off to bed....and off to the woods tomorrow to live life...in the fullest...Good night!

I'm very sorry for your loss
 
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GermanG

Piney
Apr 2, 2005
1,081
392
Little Egg Harbor
Good question. But I don’t know the answer.
When I was in college in 1979 the turkey Program was in its infancy. I had a class in wildlife management at Rutgers and Bob Erickson from Fish and Wildlife gave a presentation on the program. It was very interesting and he demonstrated a rocket net for us showing how they captured the birds from other states and brought them to New Jersey.
The first hunting season for turkey was in 1981 Which was the year I graduated. I started seeing birds locally around 82 or 83 in my area. Since then the program has been a very big success.
That class in wildlife management was the best class I ever had in college. Teaching duties were shared by three professors all of them were big-time hunters. We went to each of their homes for wild game barbecues during the semester. And the drinking age was not 21 back then so we were all allowed to bring beer. Life was indeed good !

Hmmmm. That would have been Applegate, Wolgast.....and the third? Darn that worsening memory. :(
 
I knew Laurie. She was instrumental in helping Manumuskin and myself in our endeavor's years ago. Jessica, Al and I spent hours on many days in the upstairs rooms of the building she worked at. Had lunch in the gazebo out back one day with her.

I met Laurie (as 46er said " a long, long, long time ago"!) when she ran the Avian Rehab center in Marmora. A shoestring operation, but we had some effect and I learned a lot.
What were your "endeavors"?
 

Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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I met Laurie (as 46er said " a long, long, long time ago"!) when she ran the Avian Rehab center in Marmora. A shoestring operation, but we had some effect and I learned a lot.
What were your "endeavors"?

My endeavors were maps. The man she worked with collected all the maps the state was going to trash. He stored them upstairs in two rooms that were packed with them. They were stacked on the floor, in tubes, in boxes and some actually filed in a map drawer. The first time Jessica and I visited we just took photos and left. But when we came again with Al she asked me to sort them by county. Since I knew little about the counties where Al lives he was able to do a great job doing that. Many of the maps were duplicates so I was able to get one of each duplicate which I still have here. I prefer digital because the maps take up too much room, but some I just had to have.

This blurry photo shows the blue carpet on the floor and some of the maps laying there. This was about 15 years ago.

All I can say is when many others said no Laurie said yes. I have plenty of respect for her letting me spent so much time there photographing them.

IMG_6790a.JPG
 
My endeavors were maps. The man she worked with collected all the maps the state was going to trash. He stored them upstairs in two rooms that were packed with them. They were stacked on the floor, in tubes, in boxes and some actually filed in a map drawer. The first time Jessica and I visited we just took photos and left. But when we came again with Al she asked me to sort them by county. Since I knew little about the counties where Al lives he was able to do a great job doing that. Many of the maps were duplicates so I was able to get one of each duplicate which I still have here. I prefer digital because the maps take up too much room, but some I just had to have.

This blurry photo shows the blue carpet on the floor and some of the maps laying there. This was about 15 years ago.

All I can say is when everyone else said no Laurie said yes. I have plenty of respect for her letting me spent so much time there photographing them.

View attachment 13318

Laurie Pettigrew was a state biologist, probably retired a few years ago. She regularly ran the deer check station in Cedarville. Would that all state wildlife staff were as good as her and Walt. Great people, good friends.
 

GermanG

Piney
Apr 2, 2005
1,081
392
Little Egg Harbor
Roger Locandro. I regretted not taking his class "Interesting and Edible Plants"

Roger, of course. I don't think he chipped in during my wildlife class. Perhaps it was a year or so later. I did take both his edible plants and meats classes though. Most useful two credits of my time there :). He helped get my air gun back from the University Police Chief after a slight misunderstanding :rolleyes:. 25 years later he was helping me break into a county parks van I'd locked the keys in during the Barnegat Bay Festival at Island Heights. Nice to have your back covered by friends!
 
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Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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25 years later he was helping me break into a county parks van I'd locked the keys in during the Barnegat Bay Festival at Island Heights.


Sounds like a handy guy to have around.
 
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