Conservation Organizations, Congressman Kim Celebrate $94,000 Grant for Atlantic White-Cedar

Teegate

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bobpbx

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Hmmm. From the article:

"The overpopulation of white-tailed deer, occurrence of severe wildfires, land conversion for human uses, selective tree harvesting, and human induced changes in plant and forest communities have been the leading factors in this decline.

Are deer a great killer of cedar? And no mention of beaver doing major damage to white cedar? And since when are humans allowed to convert land populated by white cedar for human use? I've never seen that happen unless it was illegal. The last time that was done, DeMarco cut down 30 acres. He was caught and fined. And what is this 'selective' tree harvesting? This sentence is likely a 'stock' sentence, and overused. I'm surprised they didn't ask Jeff Tittle of the Sierra club to comment. And, 100 acres? C'mon. That is .002 % of the total.

Just trying to keep it real.
 

GermanG

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Deer are a major hindrance to cedar regeneration. I've seen several study plots where old clearcuts had half the acreage enclosed by a solar powered electric fence. They are showed the same thing but one was especially vivid. Inside the fence the young cedar was as thick as a cornfield. Outside, it was heavily browsed, almost to the ground, the the maple and gum saplings, which are less desirable to deer, where starting to dominate.

As far as selective cutting goes, the practice is not conducive to cedar regeneration either. White Cedar, being an early succession species, needs an open seedbed. Clear-cutting is the only responsible way to harvest it. The term has developed a bad name, due to sometimes being doing incorrectly, but it is the best way to both log cedar and produce a new crop for the future.
 
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Boyd

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When I moved to my current home in 2006 there were lots of nice cedars on my land. Each time we have a heavy wind storm, several large ones snap off (I'm talking about trees out in the woods by the creek, not trees in my yard). Have lost about 4 so far this year, which is typical. While they look healthy, they are weak inside which I presume is insect damage. It occurs to me that maybe they are just getting old and dying - how long does a cedar live?

There are plenty of new ones popping up but the deer eat them all. At the current rate, most of my cedars will be gone in another 10 years or so.
 

bobpbx

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The article also indicates over population of deer in the pine barrens. Is that true? If humans suddenly disappeared, like from a virus or something, would deer eat all the cedars and cause mass extinction?
 

GermanG

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The article also indicates over population of deer in the pine barrens. Is that true? If humans suddenly disappeared, like from a virus or something, would deer eat all the cedars and cause mass extinction?
Before European settlement, there were large predators present in NJ that helped keep Bambi in check. I would assume/hope that if humans suddenly vanished, those predators might make their way back into the ecosystem, even if it took a very long time.
 
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GermanG

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When I moved to my current home in 2006 there were lots of nice cedars on my land. Each time we have a heavy wind storm, several large ones snap off (I'm talking about trees out in the woods by the creek, not trees in my yard). Have lost about 4 so far this year, which is typical. While they look healthy, they are weak inside which I presume is insect damage. It occurs to me that maybe they are just getting old and dying - how long does a cedar live?

There are plenty of new ones popping up but the deer eat them all. At the current rate, most of my cedars will be gone in another 10 years or so.
I can't say the exact lifespan of a cedar but neither insect damage to the interior wood or decay kill the tree but rather create a structural weakness. The heartwood cells are dead already and are just helping hold up the tree. A hollow tree that is protected from the wind could stand a very long time. I wouldn't want it next to my house though.

Addendum: I did find a reference to a white cedar stump aged at least 240 years at time of cutting in the Hackensack Meadowlands.
 
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