Does anybody know what this metal hardware is ?

trop81

Scout
Mar 17, 2011
43
9
8
hammonton nj
20180729_135208.jpg
there was a small bridge there before, just wondering if this is the beginning of a replacement bridge. If you look closely there are another set across the river
 
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Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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You attached a bunch of files to that post. Some were Jeep Manuels in pdf format named AW4. I deleted them and left the photo.
 

46er

Piney
Mar 24, 2004
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Coastal NJ
It is galvanized metal, one is a type of turnbuckle and there looks like trail entrance markers on the opposite side. Perhaps the start of a footbridge as both sides are oriented the same.
 

Zach McGarvey

Explorer
Feb 11, 2018
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Woodbury / Vineland NJ
I had my wife show it to her civil engineer coworkers (including some who do work for burlco and the state park/forest system), and none had any idea! It's hot-dipped galvanized so it's meant to be there for a while. Where is it?
 

lj762

Explorer
Feb 18, 2017
266
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Bass River State Forest
I'm pretty sure I know where that is. I was just there a couple of weeks ago to see if they had indeed rebuilt the bridge. I do not think those metal posts were up then. The only reason I went is that Trail Tracker (spstrailtracker.nj.gov) showed that trail without the detour that has been in place for years, so I wondered if they had restored the original trail, and if so I wanted to correct it on OpenStreetMap. Turns out no, they did nothing, Trail Tracker was just wrong.

It does indeed look like they are going to build a footbridge to replace the one that got washed away. That would be good news - it was a much nicer trail before the redirection.

Can I say where it is? Not really a secret, since there is a color trail marker visible at the top.
 

lj762

Explorer
Feb 18, 2017
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Bass River State Forest
Is this the Mullica River Trail (yellow blazed) in Wharton State Forest, where the trail used to cross the waterway known as either Mechescatauxin Creek or Sleeper Branch, after it leaves Toms Pond Trail? It sure looks like it, although I think your picture was taken from the northeast side, which is the closed-off part of the trail.

I'm guessing those are supports for a steel-cable footbridge. I don't know the correct term for it, but I've seen other bridges like it.
 

Pinesbucks

Explorer
Apr 15, 2013
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On faceplace they have pictures of the foot bridge that is going in at that location. They even referenced it as the ybuc bill crossing which I thought was cool.
 
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trop81

Scout
Mar 17, 2011
43
9
8
hammonton nj
Is this the Mullica River Trail (yellow blazed) in Wharton State Forest, where the trail used to cross the waterway known as either Mechescatauxin Creek or Sleeper Branch, after it leaves Toms Pond Trail? It sure looks like it, although I think your picture was taken from the northeast side, which is the closed-off part of the trail.

I'm guessing those are supports for a steel-cable footbridge. I don't know the correct term for it, but I've seen other bridges like it.
yes your are right on the location. It's a shame it had a nice newer bridge till mother nature decided to take it away. since then the re-route really changed a lot the scenic part of the trail
 

46er

Piney
Mar 24, 2004
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It looks like the angled adjustable rod is welded to the plate part which is slid over the one upright.
 

MuckSavage

Explorer
Apr 1, 2005
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Turnersville
The helical anchors have different style tops dependent on how they are to be used. I just used them on a project to support a concrete slab in a area that has slop for backfill.
In the picture, I'm having a hard time lining up it with the one on the opposite side of the water. Perhaps there are more to be placed & what's pictured will support timber stringers crossing the water
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
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Pines; Bamber area
I used to work on and inspect the installations of aircraft arresting machinery and steam catapults. For land based arresting systems, if I recall correctly, in order to secure the arresting machinery on the side of the airfield, they used explosive actuated anchors. The anchor tube would be set into the ground and a small charge at the bottom would blow the purposely weakened tube into a group of tangs that would hold that anchor tight. Think of opening an inverted metal umbrella in the ground, then trying to pull that out of the ground. We called them Harvey anchors after the company that held the patent.
 

Broke Jeep Joe

Explorer
Mar 8, 2006
520
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Waterford Twp
I used to work on and inspect the installations of aircraft arresting machinery and steam catapults. For land based arresting systems, if I recall correctly, in order to secure the arresting machinery on the side of the airfield, they used explosive actuated anchors. The anchor tube would be set into the ground and a small charge at the bottom would blow the purposely weakened tube into a group of tangs that would hold that anchor tight. Think of opening an inverted metal umbrella in the ground, then trying to pull that out of the ground. We called them Harvey anchors after the company that held the patent.
Bob that's unreal! I worked for a company many years ago and we rebuilt the steam catapults on just about every carrier that came into the navy yard for refurb! I was probably 20 or so! I have never heard anyone else in my life mention a steam catapult let alone say they've worked on them!!
 

bobpbx

Piney
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Oct 25, 2002
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Pines; Bamber area
Bob that's unreal! I worked for a company many years ago and we rebuilt the steam catapults on just about every carrier that came into the navy yard for refurb! I was probably 20 or so! I have never heard anyone else in my life mention a steam catapult let alone say they've worked on them!!
Very cool Joe. I've been to Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (Virginia), Charleston Naval Shipyard, and Pugent Sound (Bremerton) Washington. Was it at any of those yards? I also was the mechanical inspector for the Navy on the new catapult installations at Newport News Virginia for CVN-70 and CVN 71. I went out on sea trials too, and also did investigative work on CVN-69.