Goose Pond

Spung-Man

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Jan 5, 2009
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Yes Manumuskin,

The hog holes are still swamp land, but their period of water fill or “hydrofill” has decreased over time. The basins now remain dry long enough for woody trees to invade them, when once pond bottoms were meadows. Trees could not survive in ground that remained too wet for too long.

Ironically, your namesake is Algonquin for “to drink by swamp water,” alluding to the boiling springs once present along the banks of the Manumuskin River. These springs once had wide recognition. Bowen (1885: 39) wrote in his History of Port Elizabeth about how sparking and hygienic water bubbled profusely from the riverbanks. Despite the relatively pristine state of the Manumuskin’s surroundings today, these springs are pretty much gone.

Spung-Man
 
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Yes Manumuskin,

The hog holes are still swamp land, but their period of water fill or “hydrofill” has decreased over time. The basins now remain dry long enough for woody trees to invade them, when once pond bottoms were meadows. Trees could not survive in ground that remained too wet for too long.

Ironically, your namesake is Algonquin for “to drink by swamp water,” alluding to the boiling springs once present along the banks of the Manumuskin River. These springs once had wide recognition. Bowen (1885: 39) wrote in his History of Port Elizabeth about how sparking and hygienic water bubbled profusely from the riverbanks. Despite the relatively pristine state of the Manumuskin’s surroundings today, these springs are pretty much gone.

Spung-Man
Uncle Budd remembers such a spring on the Mullica across from Mordecai's. Would have loved to have seen that!
 

Spung-Man

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Gabe,

I’m not surprised. Rhodehamel (1973: 24) reported that between the late nineteenth and mid twentieth centuries a hydraulic head decline of ~3 to 5 feet had occurred along the Mullica River basin. He’s the US Geological Survey engineer who calculated that 17-trillion gallons of aquifer water underlies the Pine Barrens. He was transferred to Virginia (were he still resides) after trying to publish a Pinelands report that included Ice-Age geologic history.

Spung-Man
 
Apr 6, 2004
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I’m not surprised. Rhodehamel (1973: 24) reported that between the late nineteenth and mid twentieth centuries a hydraulic head decline of ~3 to 5 feet had occurred along the Mullica River basin.

Spung-Man
Wow, that is a big drop! Do you suspect that "Cake's Sprute" near Lower Bank was such a spring?
 

Spung-Man

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Why not?

Jerseyman’s etymology of spruto (Swedish: spruts–to sprout water) from the Pole Bridge post is convincing. Excellent sleuthing as usual! I would very much like to know the spring’s location.

S-M
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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Yes Manumuskin,

The hog holes are still swamp land, but their period of water fill or “hydrofill” has decreased over time. The basins now remain dry long enough for woody trees to invade them, when once pond bottoms were meadows. Trees could not survive in ground that remained too wet for too long.

Ironically, your namesake is Algonquin for “to drink by swamp water,” alluding to the boiling springs once present along the banks of the Manumuskin River. These springs once had wide recognition. Bowen (1885: 39) wrote in his History of Port Elizabeth about how sparking and hygienic water bubbled profusely from the riverbanks. Despite the relatively pristine state of the Manumuskin’s surroundings today, these springs are pretty much gone.

Spung-Man
I always wondered what manumuskin stood for. I just found this post.Would you know what Buckshutem stands for?I live right next to that swamp.
 

Spung-Man

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Manumuskin,

Buckshutem is likely an Algonquin name, but no one seems to know what it meant. There was another Buckshuem (Buckshootem) I visited thirty-years ago about 2000’ south of Wyckoff Mills on Buckshootem Branch, now called Bannen Meadow Branch.

I think this should be about where it was:


It’s been many years since I read the History of Howell by Litowinski, so somebody will have to double-check the recollection. The monograph contained a reference to the alternate Buckshutem, which inspired a road trip there up "Killer Highway 9." The area was at the sandy Pine Barrens transition zone. Howell Township was named after ex-Governor Richard Howell, who lived a while in Shiloh, Cumberland County. He was one of the Greenwich, NJ tea-burners during the Revolution. I don’t think he ever lived in the Monmouth County area, but leave open the remote possibility the place name was plucked from the Cumberland County Buckshutem just in case some of his relatives were in the area.

S-M
 

manumuskin

Piney
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I live on a road that runs through laurel lake called Battle Lane. I have Hershel Schenks (My preahcers dad) book "Indians of New Jersey) it is from the 50's.In it he claims that the road was named after an indian battle held along the road in the present day WMA.There are the remains of an old earthen dam where a grist mill was back in the 1700;s and i wonder if the battle was near this old mill site.I always played in the creek that runs through the site when I was a kid and never knew it was a mill site back then.I have never been able to locate any info other then what Schenck wrote about any battle in the vicinity of here other then Dallas ferry during the revolution which was in the Maurice river at Port Norris about 15 minutes from my house.
Al
 

Boyd

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Would you know what Buckshutem stands for?
See Beck's More Forgotten Towns of Southern New Jersey, p212-215

The explanation is so simple that it is bound to leave many as dubious or as incredulous as we were.

"I remember that a teacher in the schoolhouse up the road once asked us how Buckshutem got its name," Mr. Woodruff said. "all we could do was repeat the story as we had always heard it. They had told us that when the first houses in town were being built, a large buck deer ran across the road.

"'There goes a buck!' someone cried. 'Shoot him!" And so the town became Buckshutem!"

There are others who say the name has an Indian origin and that it came from one of the streams near by. However, the other variation, with "Buck! Shoot him!" becoming "Buckshutem" will stand for the present, for the teacher was apparently satisfied with the explanation. Why shouldn't we be?
The same story is also told, with some added comments in Beck's "The Roads of Home", p221-224

Others say the name has an Indian origin, but, if it has, none too convincing has ever been mentioned to me. Perhaps one of these days, when there is time to go up and down Maurice River like a census taker, before it is too late, piecing together the river's own story, I will come upon a variant which will hold water.
 

Spung-Man

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Did the Leni Lenape speak the same language?
Sure, a dialect:


I don't have the time to go into details, but there is a pretty interesting paper by Marshall Becker (2008. Bulletin of the Archaeological Society of New Jersey. 63: 11–32) called "Lenopi; Or, What's in a Name? Interpreting the Evidence for Cultures and Cultural Boundaries in the Lower Delaware Valley." He makes a convincing argument that our aboriginals were Jersey's, not Delaware's. Their name for themselves was probably Lenopi, not Lenape. Other cultural and linguistic differences seem to separate Lenopi from their Lenape brothers across the Delaware River.

Boyd,

Beck spins the same yarn I heard as a kid. However, finding another stream called Buckshutem in Scheyichbi (Lenopi for South Jersey) seems to put the legend in doubt.

Bob,

I don't think anyone still puts "Leni" in front of Lenape anymore.

S-M
 

manumuskin

Piney
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Mark, I'm curious why someone would choose an Algonquin name for a feature in these parts. You cited two so far.

They were a tribe more north of New York and thereabouts. Did the Leni Lenape speak the same language?

http://www.cumauriceriver.org/reaches/pg/narratives.cfm?sku=18
Thanks Bob! Yes Lenape is a dialect of the Algonquin language which encompassed much of the northeastern USA back before it was the USA.The algonquins were surrounded by the Iroquois to the north and west and the souian indians to the south and west
 

manumuskin

Piney
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Al, this was written in 2003. Do you know if it was done or ever worked....did it produce the "scores of quail and other critters (moving) among shrubs and knee-high grasses in search of seeds and insects."?

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/23/nyregion/environment-natural-habitat-or-killing-field.html?pagewanted=all
I know where that field is,i pass it every day on the way to work.I wondered why they did that on state property.They basically cut a big patch of oak/pine down,I mean cut it to the ground and took the stumps out too,I thought they were going to build something there and that maybe it wasn't state ground after all though it definitely adjoins state ground.Apparently this is what it all was about.It's on the corner of buckshutem road and gould road. I doobt it accomplished anything other then lining their pockets with a few bucks. I haven't heard a quail around here in probably 15 years or better.All I see anymore is pheasant,no grouse,no quail oh yeas and we are overrun with turkey,they walk the streets of laurel lake like they pay taxes.
Al
 

manumuskin

Piney
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I know that house!
yes they have a river view but what they don't mention is that your looking across buckshutem road and down a hill to the marsh and across a half mile of marsh to get a small glimmer of open water and that in the summer you don't even get this.Not really a bad view if you don't mind cars zooming through your view at 50 miles an hour.
 
Al,

What is ACE?

When the Unitarian church was built in Pomona on 575, It took two years of Pine Snake studies before they determined there were none. The they could finally build. Now the Unitarians are basically environmentalists so they went along peacefully, not sure a developer would be so passive, but its a possibility that if there really are PB treefrogs and Pine snakes there and the state is aware, it could be protected. But it would take a lot of watch-dogging....and activism.