Jersey Devil

Aug 6, 2010
62
0
34
Williamstown, NJ

dogg57

Piney
Jan 22, 2007
2,912
373
Southern NJ
southjerseyphotos.com
Neat info
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXhP5sSOMPY
Hammerhead+Bat+2.JPG
 

ericsanjuan

New Member
Dec 1, 2011
27
3
49
I recently hit Amazon to replace my water-damaged copy of McCloy and Miller's amazing The Jersey Devil], and was saddened to see that the publisher has replaced the classic red cover with a cartoonish monstrosity.

Compare:

51lm%2BxGS19L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

24a362e89da0b73b30123110.L._AA300_.jpg


No sir, I do not like the new cover.

I've probably read this book four or five times. I used to check it out of the elementary school library in Lakehurst. It was probably this book more than anything else that first sparked an interest in New Jersey lore.

I want my red cover back!

Okay, it's not really that big a deal. Just feels like my memories are being tampered with is all.
 

dogg57

Piney
Jan 22, 2007
2,912
373
Southern NJ
southjerseyphotos.com
I see this on Facebook,At Nixons

Have you seen the Jersey Devil? We have been contacted by a cable network doing a story on the Jersey Devil. If you’re willing to go on camera and tell your story email us at JerseyDevil@NixonsGeneralStore.com

and also at Piney Power

I have been contacted by a producer of a major cable TV station that is doing a documentary about the distinct possibility that The Jersey Devil is a real creature and not sensationalism. She wants to talk to anyone who has had a REAL experience with the Jersey Devil. If this is you, please private message me and I'll give you her name and phone number. Thanks!
 

dogg57

Piney
Jan 22, 2007
2,912
373
Southern NJ
southjerseyphotos.com
Here another View on old haunts,
Legendary Pine Barrens: New Tales from Old Haunts

In this collection of “new tales from old haunts,” Paul Evans Pedersen Jr. delivers a literary feast for Pine Barrens enthusiasts and emerges as southern New Jersey’s most exciting new storyteller in decades. There’s something here for everyone—from offbeat explanations of natural phenomena, to unconventional takes on popular legends, to strange doings in mysterious towns and taverns. Throughout, you’ll be entertained by a rogue’s gallery of weird and colorful characters.Make no mistake about it: These are not your traditional Pine Barrens legends. Pedersen’s 21 stories and three songs are inspired by South Jersey’s rich folklore and his love for the Pines, but only his remarkable imagination could have produced a work as fresh and original as The Legendary Pine Barrens.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/131698710/Legendary-Pine-Barrens-New-Tales-from-Old-Haunts
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
932
575
62
Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
I am saddened by the erosion of the folklore tradition. Storytelling was a valued part of growing up in the Pinelands, a sort of poor man's Disney. The Jersey Devil was very much a part of our culture. My grandmother came to live with us when I was young. She was called Horsey Baba; Baba for "babushka" (grandmother) and "Horsey" for her draft horse, a Percheron that was used by the Yebernetsky side back in a central Pennsylvania coal mine. She could not read or write, but had a rich oral tradition. It was my role to become the family storyteller. We also had a number of colorful live-in farmhands, with names like Peck, Mayo, and Steamboat Willie (and wife Verna). Neighbors (Waterbelly, Kingfish) and schoolmates (Link - as in missing, Frick, Wee) were equally quirky, with stories of their own.

To save a few of them in their original context, I was asked by Atlantic County Parks to present on this art-form on Friday, October 16, 2013. It's been over a decade since these stories were last told in public, although they are standard fare around the backyard campfire. Enough with non-diastrophic thermokarst involutions...

Spung-Man

Stories of the Jersey Devil and Beyond
Local natural historian Mark Demitroff grew up on a western Atlantic County poultry farm. There he enjoyed hearing tales told by neighbors, farmhands, and family members about odd happenings in the piney woods and dense swamps behind Milmay. Mark will spin a few yarns about ghosts, demons, and darksome fathomless pools with sinister qualities. Several traditional stories were passed down from the speaker’s Ukrainian heritage. Folklore, once an everyday form of entertainment, has lost its former importance but fortunately is not quite forgotten in the Pinelands National Reserve.
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
932
575
62
Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
Folks, fear not.

You are witnessing a brief bout of “periglacial fever.” Something like this hasn’t occurred here since Peter Wolfe’s 1953 paper Periglacial frost-thaw basins in New Jersey. This isn’t that wimpy glacial/proglacial/paraglacial stuff from Upstate New York. It's the hard stuff. Yes, I mean permafrost.​
There, I've said it, in public. Happy now?​
I will attempt to capture the essence of our most wicked creature who lurks amidst these forgotten cold-climate, nonglacial landforms, the famed Jersey Devil. Knowledge of the cryospheric realm is requisite if we are to feel the intimate “sense of place” in which locals view these wetland features.​
Check out the illustration of Satan’s laird (a spung) opposite page 179 in Beck’s (1945) Jersey Genesis: The Story of the Mullica River.​
darksome pool.jpg
“Where stunted pines of burned-over forest are revealed in darksome pools, the Jersey Devil lurks.”
You have been warned...​
 

noboat

Explorer
Feb 1, 2010
303
116
61
Waterford Works
Folks, fear not.

You are witnessing a brief bout of “periglacial fever.” Something like this hasn’t occurred here since Peter Wolfe’s 1953 paper Periglacial frost-thaw basins in New Jersey. This isn’t that wimpy glacial/proglacial/paraglacial stuff from Upstate New York. It's the hard stuff. Yes, I mean permafrost.​
There, I've said it, in public. Happy now?​
I will attempt to capture the essence of our most wicked creature who lurks amidst these forgotten cold-climate, nonglacial landforms, the famed Jersey Devil. Knowledge of the cryospheric realm is requisite if we are to feel the intimate “sense of place” in which locals view these wetland features.​
Check out the illustration of Satan’s laird (a spung) opposite page 179 in Beck’s (1945) Jersey Genesis: The Story of the Mullica River.​
“Where stunted pines of burned-over forest are revealed in darksome pools, the Jersey Devil lurks.”
You have been warned...​

I'm not scared!!!
 
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