Man Dies From Medical Emergency Experienced In Wharton State Forest

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
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Pines; Bamber area
They are woods. Woods are woods. Odd piece of writing. Can't even tell where he's talking about...."north of Wading River, along the Great Swamp"?
 

Jon Holcombe

Explorer
Dec 1, 2015
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Medford
I was trying to figure out where the location was. I thought the Great Swamp was south of Rt. 206 and north of Batsto. Is there a Great Swamp north of the Wading?

And how would a MAP have helped save the gentleman? The MAP wouldn't change or rename existing roads or regrade the existing roads, it would just make driving on smaller roads illegal.

The source (?) also said "“to improve emergency response on land if no one can improve the roads of the woods.” So EMT's and Park Police have to bushwack through the "Great Swamp"?

Makes me wonder who the "source" was. It seems like they were taking advantage of an unfortunate situation and trying to score political points for their agenda.
 

Jon Holcombe

Explorer
Dec 1, 2015
782
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Medford
They are woods. Woods are woods. Odd piece of writing. Can't even tell where he's talking about...."north of Wading River, along the Great Swamp"?
I just realized the article says "WASHINGTON". So it really was near the Great Swamp but the "source" must have gotten his rivers wrong. It must have been either the Mullica, Sleeper Branch, Nescochague, or Gun Branch.

I wonder if the "source" runs a canoe livery in that area.

**EDIT** Actually the Great Swamp appears to be in Hammonton, so now I am still confused.
**EDIT 2** The family is asking that donations be made to "greatswamp.org", which is the tiny great swamp near Morristown in north/central Jersey. That is certainly north of the Wading River, but nowhere near the Pine Barrens.
 
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Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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It depresses me that he recently retired. He spends his complete life waiting for that day when he could get on his motorcycle anytime he wanted and just ride away the hours doing something he enjoyed. And then ...............

BTW, Rob from work who I hike with ocationally retired today. He said to me he may get a dirt bike and ride the woods. No lie!
 

Boyd

Super Moderator
Staff member
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Jul 31, 2004
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Ben's Branch, Stephen Creek
I saw the same with my friends from work, which is why I retired at 62. That was nine years ago, if I had stayed on the job I have no doubt that I'd be dead now. My bank balance would have been higher though... but like they say, who wants to be the richest guy in the graveyard? :D
 

MuckSavage

Explorer
Apr 1, 2005
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Turnersville
Turns out the gentleman who passed is a very active member of the motorcycle community & is very knowledgeable about the location. Not a "lost in the woods" story.
I read some commentary on another forum from the man riding with Jimmr. He gave high praise to State Park Police, EMS for their professional, quick & compassionate service.
 

old jersey girl

Explorer
Jul 26, 2017
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south nj near Delaware bayshore
I saw the same with my friends from work, which is why I retired at 62. That was nine years ago, if I had stayed on the job I have no doubt that I'd be dead now. My bank balance would have been higher though... but like they say, who wants to be the richest guy in the graveyard? :D
When I was caring for my father during his terminal illness, we shared this: "The Brinks truck don't follow the hearse."
 
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RednekF350

Piney
Feb 20, 2004
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Pestletown, N.J.
I saw the same with my friends from work, which is why I retired at 62. That was nine years ago, if I had stayed on the job I have no doubt that I'd be dead now. My bank balance would have been higher though... but like they say, who wants to be the richest guy in the graveyard? :D
My father's co-workers basically dragged him kicking and screaming from his job at 62. He loved to work and he did very heavy work until he walked out the door.

It took him a year or so to adjust. He was a very simple man and my mother and him just took rides to the shore and went out to dinner. Then Alzheimer's set in around 68 and by 70 we were taking the keys away from him. By 72 he was in nursing care and after a a difficult and sometimes violent ride he was gone at 78, a shell of his former self.

I'll be 62 very soon and those thoughts are in my mind every day.
This my Dad in his late 50's a hundred or so feet in the air.
Dad 12106821_10205258147478714_3218337103275723608_n.jpg
 

Teegate

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Sep 17, 2002
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I am 63 and fortunately my moms family lives a long time. My mom is 92 and her aunt made 102 and most others made late 80's to early 90's. However, I am 5 years older than my dad and his dad ever made. Heart attacks. His brother lived longer but had heart issues. My brother and I are the last males alive.
 
Jul 12, 2006
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Gloucester City, NJ
Don't recall if I ever told this story here or not. My grandfather has been passed for several decades now.

He worked a as foreman for all his life, after returning from WW-II, at Mcandrew and Forbes (spelling) in Camden. They processed black licorice.

He and my Grandmother were never rich, but they were comfortable. I remember, like it was yesterday, the day he retired at at 62ish. He was so proud that he did everything he needed to do in order to be able to retire at the earliest age possible to collect SS, his pension, etc.

His "thing" was to watch and bet on the Eagles and the Phillies. He'd go into town, get his hair cut, talk to his booky and the boys, place some bets on the ponies and come home. He loved his beer, his cat and his family.

Within 6 months of his retirement, he was diagnosed with cancer in his neck, which eventually killed him in a couple of years.

My point? Do all the right things, enjoy life, be kind to others and remember...... you can't take it with you.