Nash's Cabin and Ogden Nash

Ben Ruset

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I have done a bit of looking around and am pretty convinced that Ogden Nash is not the Nash that the cabin is named after.

Here's a biography:
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fa/nash.bio.html
and
http://www.mdkidspage.org/nash.html

He was born in 1902 and died in 1971. The cabin can probably be dated to the early 1900s-1920s. He didn't start working independantly until the 1930s, which meant that he would have had to commute to New York from the time that he left college (1921) until the time that he quit working in 1932. When he quit working for the New Yorker, he moved to Maryland where he stayed until his death.

Given the other ruins in the area, I think it was a place where workers from Martha lived, including James Nash who appears in the Martha Furnace Diaries.
 
B

bach2yoga

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bruset said:
I have done a bit of looking around and am pretty convinced that Ogden Nash is not the Nash that the cabin is named after.

Here's a biography:
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fa/nash.bio.html
and
http://www.mdkidspage.org/nash.html

He was born in 1902 and died in 1971. The cabin can probably be dated to the early 1900s-1920s. He didn't start working independantly until the 1930s, which meant that he would have had to commute to New York from the time that he left college (1921) until the time that he quit working in 1932. When he quit working for the New Yorker, he moved to Maryland where he stayed until his death.

Given the other ruins in the area, I think it was a place where workers from Martha lived, including James Nash who appears in the Martha Furnace Diaries.

Doesn't sound likely now, does it? Whoever built it had money...the glazed brick and slate were not inexpensive building materials, especially back then. But it was likely to be at least early 1900s given the fact that the fireplace had a flue, and on top of that it was round. A lot of earlier fireplaces didn't have flues. If O. Nash didn't work until the 30s, he sure didn't have money for glazed brick and slate.
Best way to date the cabin would be to research the brick and the round flue...round clay flue is interesting, especially given its thickness...round clay flues are still available, but most flues are square or rectangular, unless it's a Spanish stucco style house or something like that.
Of several hundred fireplaces that Joe has built, only one required a round flue.
Renee
 

KARL

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Sep 7, 2003
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HI RENEE.........ENJOYED YOUR REMARKS ON DATING CHIMNEYS.........EVEN AN OLD PINEY LIKE ME CAN ALWAYS LEARN SOMETHIN NEW.........ANY OTHER WAYS OF DATING RUNINS YOU CAN THINK OF, DO WRITE ABOUT THEM............PRESS ON,KARL
 
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BarryC

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I forgot this thread was here.
As I said somewhere else on these forums, I was at Nash's a couple months ago and met up with a couple in their 60s who hiked up there, and had been doing same for years and years. They know someone who has pictures of the cabin, inside and out, from when it was still in use. They told me that the person with the pictures was a member there- it was a small hunting club. But they didn't tell me where the name Nash fit in.
Barry
bruset said:
I have done a bit of looking around and am pretty convinced that Ogden Nash is not the Nash that the cabin is named after.

Here's a biography:
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fa/nash.bio.html
and
http://www.mdkidspage.org/nash.html

He was born in 1902 and died in 1971. The cabin can probably be dated to the early 1900s-1920s. He didn't start working independantly until the 1930s, which meant that he would have had to commute to New York from the time that he left college (1921) until the time that he quit working in 1932. When he quit working for the New Yorker, he moved to Maryland where he stayed until his death.

Given the other ruins in the area, I think it was a place where workers from Martha lived, including James Nash who appears in the Martha Furnace Diaries.
 
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