Penns Hill Trail at Wells Mill Park

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by JeffD, Sep 19, 2003.

  1. JeffD

    JeffD Explorer

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    Recently, I hiked past Penns Hill and Laurel Hill on the Penns Hill Trail at Wells Mill County Park. I say I went past, rather than to these hills because these hills didn't stand out and offer a vista as I had expected. It was a nice hike, though, as the trail took me up and down hills on my assent as their was a net gain in elevation. The most scenic part of the hike was the cedar swamps. Even with all the rain we had had, the trail was dry, everywhere, even though the cedar swamps!

    I didn't take the full 8 and a half mile route, but cut back along Ridge Road/Drift Road, following the yellow markers where the white blazed trail leads to the lower lying cedar swamp area, which were conspicuous. The only trouble I had navigating was near the beginning of the hike, where a trail abruptly ends near a road by a dock on Wells Mills Lake on my left and a cabin on the right. I circumnavigated just a little, but got on track OK. I later discovered I could have gone straight at that junction. It would have been nice to have a blaze on the other side of the road there.

    The trails I followed at Wells Mills were well maintained and defined. There was one small area where it was just slightly overgrown. The map that I got at the park office is clear, although the white blazed trail seemed to go on forever, and I thought I had missed the yellow blaze where I turned to shorten the loop. I wasn't sure exactly where I was while I was on the Penns Hill Trail, and wasn't even sure what was Penns Hill and Laurel Hill. Maybe a sign that indicates these hills would help. And maybe a GPU?

    A sign at the park asked visitors if they don't take the map home, then return it to the park office so it could be recycled. I took it home, and when I don't think I have any use for it, I'll leave it out in the elements to the paper can be recyled. It is a good idea for park visitors to return the maps to the office if they won't need it. Rather than throwing a map out, it can be reused so the park doesn't have to spend the time and money to print more.

    BTW, where did everybody go? Lost in cyberspace or carried out to sea by the hurricane? Maybe I'll have to do more satires to get some activity on this board. As Oscar Wilde said," there's only one thing worse than being talked about, and that's not being talked about."

    I guess the eco-clowns have nothing much to offer; they just answer to defend their views when someone challenges their nutty ideas.