Pieces Of Hampton Park History

Teegate

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All,

In my ever constant search for information on the stones at Hampton Park (Hampton Furnace), I had the pleasure of traveling 180 miles today with Ted Gordon to visit Daryl Goodrich who's family owned Hampton Park until the state took it from them in 1964. When the legal battle was over and it was time to leave the property their family owned for almost 100 years, they cleaned house and took everything with them that they could. I would have to believe that most of the times that this occurs many if not all of these items disappear over the years as family dies off; however, this time is not one of them and you will be treated to a small glimpse of history that will not slip away.

I am proud to say I am now the owner of one of the R&W stones of Rider & Wilkinson. This marbel marker has the same features as the last one I found at Hampton Park. What is interesting is that this one does not have the period after the R.




These tool are from Hampton Park. The one in the front that looks like a cross is called a "dibble." The very bottom of this tool is curved and rounded, and when planting cranberries they would lay the vines out in the field and use the dibble to push them into the ground. The vines would then take root and grow. So if you ever are asked what a dibble is you now will know.



This next two engines were used in the packing house at Hampton. Sorry for the view but it was cramped there.







This is the Otto engine built sometime in the late 1880's that ran all of the machinery in the packing house. It was removed in pieces by Daryl just before the state took control of the place.





The drum that the belts turned or the drum that turned the belts. Either way you get the idea.



This bell was in the attic of the house that now has the cellar hole remains in the field. On the side of it is forged the date of 1886. One could assume that sometime in the past it was used to alert the workers in the field that it was time to start working or it was the end of the day.








The bell clapper.




Part of the engine again.



Hampton Park was part of the Eatmor co-op.



A wet grinder to sharpen the tools at Hampton. You had to crank it by hand.



The actual wooden cranberry barrels from Hampton. Some still have the wooden strap around it and some appear to have had them replaced with metal straps.



The pickers boxes. If you were a picker you were given one of these and the number on the side would allow them and yourself to know how many cranberries you picked for the day.



Ted brandishing one of the many hand scoops.



We were both given a few packing labels that was there along with packing boxes still unused.





This is a real treasure. This lamp was removed from the attic of the house with the cellar hole. It may have been used in years gone by at the packing house.



Ted holding one of the extra long rakes that we saw. He says they are quite unusual and may have been needed to reach down from the banks of the bogs.



This tank held the water to cool the Otto engine in the packing house.



The following are the deeds to the property from various dates in the 1880's. I was able to view and photograph the deed describing the location of all of the property stones. One even described the location of a stone from the "New House" built by Rider & Wilkinson. We are not certain if it was one of the houses in the field or it may have been a house that was reported to have been on the Roberts Branch (Skit) at one time.



You may have remembered in previous posts that I mentioned there were stones that seem to have been in the center of Carranza Road. Well, we now know they were R&W stones that either are still under Carranza (Tuckerton) road or were removed and long gone.



I have more info I will post below. Gibby...make sure you read it :)


Guy
 

Teegate

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Gibby .... recently when walking the road at Hampton where you and I both noticed the pipes in the road, I noticed they were showing again after having been filled in when the bridge was repaired. Ted was with me and I showed them to him and we discussed what they might be. Today, when we were sitting around talking with Daryl the answer come out without warning. Both Ted and I looked at each other and laughed, both knowing we had recently been discussing this. The fact is the house with the cellar hole which is where the Goodrich family stayed when they were there had a flooding problem. In order to alleviate this problem a pipe was run from the house under the road down towards the river. We all now assume that as the puddles in the road became larger from the flooding and vehicle traffic the pipes were exposed and at some point were pushed aside where they still are today. He was adamant that the pipes went straight across the road and did not follow it so they had to have been pushed to the side.

We also learned that there was phone sevice there even though they did not have electricity. The phone lines came in along the road from Carranza and the packing house and the homes in the field had phones. Most likely the poles were removed or they were destroyed by fire and I have never viewed any evidence of them.

There is so much more we discussed and some of it I won't mention because it was not my questions that brught that info out today. And because my memory is so bad I don't want to get the facts wrong. I will leave that for some other time.

Guy
 

Boyd

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Very cool stuff Guy - thanks for posting all this. I also have an Eatmor label that I found awhile ago in an antique store hanging on my kitchen wall. :)

 

Gibby

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Teegate, thanks for the answer to why the pipes are there. Interesting enough, when I went through Hampton Road last Thursday, a large amount of water was flowing along the foundation of the old residence. From the volume I saw, I can understand the need for pipes that large. Thanks for this thread, I am enjoying it very much.;)
 

Teegate

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I am glad you all enjoyed my report. I always am happy about that but am very poor about saying so. In any event, Boyd, there were about 30 different brands from what I understand. I have the American Beauty and the Sunrise labels.

Guy
 

Gibby

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I think that the first engine pictured (third picture) might be a 6hp Mogul hopper cooled engine. The engine in picture five and six is definitly an Otto. Appears that the packing house used two different engines for power.
 

RednekF350

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Very nice Guy, a real treasure trove of pines history.
Is the monument going to become a wallhanger ?
I also have a framed Eatmor label that I purchaed at the Tuckerton Gunning Show about 10 years ago.
 

bobpbx

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Very neat stuff Guy. You must have been thrilled. I like that chair, I wonder where the seat went.

I'd have a great time selling those items on Ebay. Before you all yell about that, I figure that the fun and money I get from doing that will more than equal the satisfaction I get from looking them over in the garage once a year. Besides, I could always save a few things.
 

ecampbell

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A great report Guy. Hampton Park is finally getting some flesh on it.
BTW, why did you call it Hampton Park, I never heard of the area being called that before?
I can't help but wonder if they have some more old pictures of the area.
 

Teegate

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There is one more possible photo that may show up.

Ed... I call it Hampton Park because I learned recently it has been called that for over 100 years by the people who worked and lived there.

Guy
 

flash

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Simply amazing! I will now have mental images of the place next time i visit
 

Teegate

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Well, I have learned that the pipe in the hole in the road must be some sort of drainage pipe for the road. The pipe that drained the house was a steel pipe and may be deeper or may be long gone.

Guy
 

turtle

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Guy, nice to see that your investigative work continues to bring you great rewards. When I say rewards, I mean by the way of information, access and photos.....along with answers to the many mysteries of the pines. What a treasure! Good for you...good for us. :)
Thanks for sharing.
 

woodjin

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Wow!!!! great stuff Guy! I too have an Eatmor Cranberries label, but I think most of them are just prints that we see around. you got the real deal.
 

Teegate

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I appreciate everyones kind words. There may be more info to come in the coming month or two. I will keep you all informed.

Guy
 
Guy,
Your photos of the 10 hp Otto engine and of the various other artifacts are great, considering their partial concealment beneath piles of unrelated stuff we had to climb over in Daryl's pole barn. I thought I'd comment further on the use of the name "Hampton Park" for the area known to most of us as Hampton Furnace. Long ago I learned from interviews with several now-deceased owners and employees of the cranberry operation here --the Claybergers, Goodriches, Wells and others--that they always referred to this cranberry farm as "Hampton Park," at least from the early 1900s to 1964 when the state took possession of their property. The place has also been known as "Hampton Bogs" or just plain "Hampton." Those interested in the bog iron industry are familiar with the names and sites of Hampton Furnace near the ruins of the cranberry sorting house, Hampton Upper Forge on nearby Robbin's Run or Robert's Branch (aka Skit Branch), Hampton Lower Forge (or Washington Forge) on the Batsto a couple of miles or so above Quaker Bridge, and Hampton Gate at the intersection of the upper Batsto and the old Tuckerton stage road (now Carranza Road). The outstanding historian Arthur Pierce erroneously speculated that there was a formal entrance gate to the furnace tract at the site of Hampton Gate. What was here was a water gate or sluice gate (not a gate blocking the road) that backed up a huge pond or reservoir above the Tuckerton Road that served as an auxiliary, emergency, water supply to power the furnace wheel a substantial distance downstream. Segments of the old "jackassable" road along the west bank of the river that once served as a major access to the furnace have been almost completely devoured by vegetation regrowth.

In his "Sign Posts," a fine book on place names of Burlington County, the late Henry Bisbee of Burlington, one of my childhood mentors on local history, inaccurately lists "Hampton Park" as being a village in Southampton Township. He is actually describing Hampton Lakes off Route 70 adjacent to present day Leisuretowne.

Lost Town Hunter