Today

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,783
8,427
The yellow orchids are starting to bloom.

DSC_5785a.jpg


Another from today.

DSC_5776a.jpg
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
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8,427
We went to Quarter Mile today to check again this year for the yellow orchids we found years ago. They are not growing because as expected the disturbance has ended and the vegetation around the location is growing blocking the sun.
 

Scroggy

Scout
Jul 5, 2022
80
112
Delaware
Very nice! Saw P. clavellata and P. blephariglottis along the Skit Saturday with a few friends.

At an entirely different and distant location, we found an adult Crotalus horridus in some reeds at the water's edge, which was a distinct surprise! Looks like I last saw one of those 11 years ago, on a Walt Bien trip to Warren Grove.

How often do people see those, anyway? I'm now wondering where solo expeditions to savannahs fall in terms of risk assessment, on a scale from zero to "I could build a carbon fiber submarine".
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
Very nice! Saw P. clavellata and P. blephariglottis along the Skit Saturday with a few friends.

At an entirely different and distant location, we found an adult Crotalus horridus in some reeds at the water's edge, which was a distinct surprise! Looks like I last saw one of those 11 years ago, on a Walt Bien trip to Warren Grove.

How often do people see those, anyway? I'm now wondering where solo expeditions to savannahs fall in terms of risk assessment, on a scale from zero to "I could build a carbon fiber submarine".
People on this site know exactly where to go to see them, and they do visit them. But seeing them in the savanna where you'd normally walk is rare. I'd say the risk is a 1. I always look at the ground where I walk, and they are not agressive at all. They want to avoid being detected and will move away from you.
 

dragoncjo

Piney
Aug 12, 2005
1,547
262
42
camden county
When I was out in the barrens 2-3x a week I would see probably 12-24Timbers a season and neonates would take that number up several dozen more. Timbers like deep thick woods so they are seldomly actually seen. You will see pregnant females in more open areas however. Seeing them in a savannah is more rare, it was probably a male or non gravid female cooling off. If we are walking in thick wet areas I would almost prod the area before stepping.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,783
8,427
Very nice! Saw P. clavellata and P. blephariglottis along the Skit Saturday with a few friends.

At an entirely different and distant location, we found an adult Crotalus horridus in some reeds at the water's edge, which was a distinct surprise! Looks like I last saw one of those 11 years ago, on a Walt Bien trip to Warren Grove.

How often do people see those, anyway? I'm now wondering where solo expeditions to savannahs fall in terms of risk assessment, on a scale from zero to "I could build a carbon fiber submarine".
We saw P. clavellata (Green Woodland to me) yesterday as well, but the count was much less that the last time I was there. We are going back again next week or the next because they were not prime yet.
 

Scroggy

Scout
Jul 5, 2022
80
112
Delaware
Thanks, that gives me some idea. I know if I'm in the mountains, I do give some thought to not putting my hand into, or directly in front of, niches that might accommodate a rattlesnake as it might not give warning. If they're mostly hanging out in open country to thermoregulate that's not very alarming.
 
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