? About Difference in NJ Stones

LARGO

Piney
Sep 7, 2005
1,535
101
1,043
50
Pestletown
Largo,
Yes, from the photographs your walls appear to be built of darker colored ironstone and lighter colored silcrete. Way cool. Do you know the age of the shown structures? Are the stones reused from older buildings?
Spung-Man
The Barn so far as I can tell is pretty close to late 1880's.
Say 1888 for guv'mnt work.

The Fireplace of the R/I in Nesco, about 1934 or so.

On question #2 it is more likely with the fireplace than the barn.

g.
 

imkms

Explorer
Feb 18, 2008
481
105
43
SJ and SW FL
Where in Marlton?

Guy
I just spoke with my FIL and it sounds like the stone came from the field (which is now numerous ball fields) across the street from what is now Lenape High School , which I guess is actually in Medford Twp. They came across the stone by accident when they noticed that the field was full of corn except for this one large area. When they asked the farmer why he never planted there, he showed them the stone. He remembers it being well over 100' in diameter and they chipped away for three weeks with hammer and chisel to get enough stones. He thinks this was sometime between 1930 to 1932. They also used smaller pieces of the stones as chinks (instead of nails) for the Settlers Inns log walls. Before they razed the building these stones were offered at $5.00 a piece as memorabilia.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
22,630
4,576
1,093
I just spoke with my FIL and it sounds like the stone came from the field (which is now numerous ball fields) across the street from what is now Lenape High School , which I guess is actually in Medford Twp. They came across the stone by accident when they noticed that the field was full of corn except for this one large area. When they asked the farmer why he never planted there, he showed them the stone. He remembers it being well over 100' in diameter and they chipped away for three weeks with hammer and chisel to get enough stones. He thinks this was sometime between 1930 to 1932. They also used smaller pieces of the stones as chinks (instead of nails) for the Settlers Inns log walls. Before they razed the building these stones were offered at $5.00 a piece as memorabilia.
Thank you for the info.

Guy
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
933
570
93
60
Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
more time than money

They came across the stone by accident when they noticed that the field was full of corn except for this one large area.
Imkms,

Thanks for the post! I guess people had more time than money during the Great Depression. That's a lot of work. Do you happen to know if the collected stones were reddish ironstone or whitish silcrete?

Spung-Man
 

imkms

Explorer
Feb 18, 2008
481
105
43
SJ and SW FL
Imkms,

Thanks for the post! I guess people had more time than money during the Great Depression. That's a lot of work. Do you happen to know if the collected stones were reddish ironstone or whitish silcrete?

Spung-Man
No, I don't know the answer to that question, they simply referred to it as jersey stone or sandstone. Your right, that was a lot of work, but it was good work during the Depression. I wonder how the Great Depression affected the Pine Barrens communities? I imagine the pinelands population had to decrease then.
 

Kevinhooa

Explorer
Mar 12, 2008
332
25
28
37
Hammonton, NJ.
www.flickr.com
Harrisville has some pretty sizable sandstone walls. The chimney at Atsion, and the second paper mill at Weymouth are also of brick and sandstone. A lot of the mill buildings at Batsto are stucco coated Sandstone and I'm sure there are many, many others. The old stone village house on Old Egg Harbor Rd. (near Depford) has some nice square-cut sandstone in it as well as a really old church in Fairton. It is a shame I don't live at that house anymore too. I would have loved to quarry some of it and building something out of it one day. We had the really hard almost purplish stone all the way to the softer deep red. Actually when we made the driveway to the house we flattened and graded it through the woods so the building supply trucks could get in and dug up a lot that was on the surface. We piled it to the sides to collect later on and a couple of weeks later, someone came with a truck and stole it. So to some, it seems to be quite a valuable resource.

Kevin