Bass River Fire Tower proposal

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by lj762, Jan 24, 2018.

  1. lj762

    lj762 Explorer

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    That's interesting, but what IS it? It also doesn't look like something the CCC built (CCC camp and work areas were all around there).
     
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  2. h2ochild

    h2ochild Scout

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    I'd be glad to hear the answer. I've wondered for years.
     
  3. bobpbx

    bobpbx Piney
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    This 1930 aerial shows there may have been something there at that time (if I'm right about Guy's location).

    upload_2018-1-28_22-14-17.png
     
  4. Teegate

    Teegate Administrator
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    You are correct.
     
  5. c1nj

    c1nj Explorer

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    It is important to note that the CCC assumed the white pines planted in the vicinity of the tower would have been harvested before they affected the view of the tower. They were planted as resource. We have different values now.
     
  6. 1Jerseydevil

    1Jerseydevil Explorer

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    True. Forest fires are responsible for the creation of the Pines and depend on it. I guess the next best are the controlled burns but that only thins the ground cover not the canopies. Mentioned further down in this thread the white pines are not native and were planted to be harvested as a resource. I'm sure the intention was lumber or paper, not wood chips left to rot. I just got caught up in the beauty of those forests vs the ignorant tangled nightmare of the Pines that are NOT burned. Another "oasis" is the corner along the county line at Coyle Field.
     
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  7. ecampbell

    ecampbell Piney

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  8. bobpbx

    bobpbx Piney
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  9. ecampbell

    ecampbell Piney

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    I was trying to point out how these feel good plantings don't turn into mature forests. The Lebanon fire tower is one example. Bartlets Bridge is another example of a cedar swamp. They need thinning.
    Bartlets Bridge s.jpg
     
  10. ecampbell

    ecampbell Piney

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    I have been following that boat since the early 1970's. I am looking for a more intact picture.
     
  11. lj762

    lj762 Explorer

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    Apparently the option to clear trees (vs replacing the tower) is expected to cost the state nothing at all. I think that means the state would put out a zero-cost contract where whoever cuts the trees keeps the wood.
     
  12. Teegate

    Teegate Administrator
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    Thanks for the info.
     
  13. dragoncjo

    dragoncjo Piney

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    There is a ccc planting off Allen road that was a nice piece of habitat for a long time. Now the trees are getting so tall and shadying out the area proving it to be worthless. There is no shortage of trees or thick pine forest. There is however shortages of open healthy pine barrens forest. I like both versions of the forest because they serve a purpose. Its just very cool to watch a space open up and species flock to it like an oasis in the forest.
     
  14. Teegate

    Teegate Administrator
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    #34 Teegate, Mar 22, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  15. 46er

    46er Piney

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    Wasn't asked anything to read the article.

    Anything 80+ years is definitely old, almost real old, bordering on ancient. No offense toward anyone that old on this site. I would think having a structural engineer check it out would be one of the first things to do, especially if they are planning to use it for the next 10 years.
     
  16. lj762

    lj762 Explorer

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    Interesting side-story: There is talk of a Sequoia tree growing in one of the areas scheduled for Phase I clearing and burning. A reliable source says the CCC planted "a lot of weird trees" there, as part of an experimental plantation to see what grows best, including the Sequoia. I asked: Wouldn't we notice if a 400' tall giant redwood was growing there? The response was: it hasn't been long enough, and there isn't enough water, for it to grow that tall.

    I've walked through the area in question twice, looking for it, but I don't really know what I'm looking at, and it's a rough area - no trails or tracks, lots of trees down on the ground. There's another person who is very interesting in finding it. She believes it is somewhere out there and wants to take a hiking group there to see it before it is gone. I've offered to help look but we haven't yet found a time we can both do it.
     
  17. Boyd

    Boyd Super Moderator
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    Could redwoods actually grow in our soil and climate? I wouldn't have thought so. I lived in Northern California for a year and loved those big trees, which were right outside our door. I brought some seeds when I returned East and wanted to grow a tree in a flower pot but didn't have any luck at all. ;)
     
  18. Teegate

    Teegate Administrator
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    That is a really interesting place to walk. It is so different there compared to the rest of the pines.
     
  19. 46er

    46er Piney

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    They can, we brought a couple Sequoia seedlings home when we were out there visiting. They were for sale in the Muir Woods VC. They lasted for quite a few months then checked out, probably more our fault. Our acidic soil should be perfect for them, but I think they need the humidity.

    Some NJ examples;

    https://www.giant-sequoia.com/gallery/usa/new-jersey/
     
  20. 46er

    46er Piney

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    Check my link above for pictures in NJ. The bark may be the give away.
     
    #40 46er, Mar 22, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018