Camp food recipes

Furball1

Explorer
Dec 11, 2005
378
1
Florida
Hey Y'al: Well, September is almost upon us. You'se guys up there hardly had a summer, whilst weez down here (FL) have just reached the half-way mark of 90+ degree weather, with about 60 days of more of the same. I ain't complain'in mind you, 'cause on Jan. 1st I'll be surf-fishin in shorts and a t-shirt, like I do every Jan. 1st. Whoops, off-topic. Well, this leads me to the subject of camp cookery 'cause some of us will hit the woods and camp anticipating the retreat of blood suckin' vermin and enjoying the crisp air of autumn. So, to get things started, here's one of my favorite recipes: Prior to your trip, make a meat loaf (85/15 chuck is good) to your liking and freeze it. You can bring the veggies you want and prep them at the campsite or prepare them in advance and to your liking: sliced onions, garlic, potatoes, celery, carrots, asparagras, whatever. You'll need some aluminum foil.Lots of it. Prep your camp-fire by allowing it to tumble into itself into a deep layer of glowing coals. (It's a good idea to scoop out some sand prior to building the fire so you have a slight depression for the coals to fall into.) Take your trusty camp shovel (you still got one of them from Boy Scouts, right?) and scoop out a hollow in the coals. You already did the following (don't try to get ahead of me now !): on a large sheet of aluminum foil place the thawed or thawing meatloaf, quartered potatoes, cut carrots, the whole works. Salt and Pepper and other seasonings like Tabasco etc. Wrap it up and seal it good. Don't be skimpy on the foil. Flip it and wrap another layer of foil. Flip it and add another layer of foil. Take this big pregnant rectangle, seat it in the place of honor (the hollow), cover it with the remaining coals. Start whittling a miniature canoe out of a piece of cedar while the wonderful blend of wholesome goodness starts to cook--it's gettin' done when you can smell the wonderful amalgam of onions and beef fat and garlic and pepper and...oh my gosh, I just drooled on my keyboard ! LOL ! Depending on the size of your "loaf", takes only 45 minutes. When done ( you can also check by pressing the flat end of your shovel on the foil--if it's firm the meat is done. Biggest thing is to make sure the potatoes are done, eh? ) lift the rectangle from the coals, remove the camp salt, and take your trusty Buck knife and cut right through the foil. If you're the lucky one doing the cutting you get the first whiff of edible air ! Serve on fine china if yeah got it. If not, just eat from the foil. Be sure to bring some Italian rolls to suck up the juices in the bottom. Excuse me now while I start a campfire out in my backyard !
 

MarkBNJ

Piney
Jun 17, 2007
1,878
70
Long Valley, NJ
www.markbetz.net
We used to cook like that all the time when I was younger and did a lot of camping. You don't even necessarily have to pre-cook the meats. I've roasted many a chunk of beef wrapped in foil in amongst the coals, accompanied by potatoes, carrots, and whatever else we wanted to throw in. Another favorite was to bring one of those large cans of juice, which we would consume early. When it was empty a rock was used to pound one end in a little, and the can was placed in the fire. Once it was hot the hollow part made a great place to fry eggs. I also knew a guy who would steam camp biscuits in foil, using a ziplock bag of bisquick, some creek water, and oil.
 

Furball1

Explorer
Dec 11, 2005
378
1
Florida
No, the meat is not pre-cooked. I would freeze the RAW meatloaf and put it in the ice-chest. Then I would put it in the foil with the veggies.
 

Piney Boy

Explorer
Sep 19, 2005
365
1
Williamstown, NJ
Sounds tasty!
Me and woodsy recipes are simple for the most part; 1 part ramen noodles 1 part precooked crab cake= backpacker heaven. I do indulge with a bottle or two of lipton iced tea, I sure do enjoy that after a day of trail time......maybe a beer or two as well.
Personally I like to have a newbie along, stash a few in his/her pack, and when we get to camp voila! beers for all:rofl:Its an intiation of sorts:science:
 

Furball1

Explorer
Dec 11, 2005
378
1
Florida
More Camp Chow

Bacon, eggs, and homefries--I could live off of them in the woods ! Fried sweet potatoes are UNBELIEVABLE along with fried eggs. The aroma of bacon frying, with the woodsmoke, OMG, I'm salivating again on the keyboard! Making toast without burning it was always a challenge, but still fun. It was fun trying to find a very small sapling (oops, did I break a law???) with a "fork" wide enough to accomodate a slice of bread. You had to bring "non-flimsy" bread--a loaf of Italian you could slice thick to make some tasty toast. Also, fresh Jersey apples. OMG, I cannot verbalize how much I miss them. Trail-mix. I'm really surprised more folks haven't posted about this topic.
 

glowordz

Explorer
Jan 19, 2009
585
8
SC
www.gloriarepp.com
Has anyone ever tried this? Children love it. Easier to do than all these words make it seem.

SNAKE BREAD or Bannock
Serves one hungry camper.

1 c flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp sugar
¼ tsp salt
2 T buttermilk powder
3 T (scant) vegetable oil

Mix well (to form a coarse meal) and carry in airtight plastic bag. Will last without refrigeration for a couple of days, longer at high altitudes.

For regular bannock, add ½ c water to the mix.
For snake bread, use a tad less water. If you are careful, you can mix it right in the bag.

Next, open the bag fully, exposing it to air, and allow the mixture to rest for 10 minutes.

Cut a green switch the size of a broom handle for each packet (ahem, unless it's illegal :D ) Leave numerous one-inch branch stubs for the last 10 inches toward the cooking end. Heat the stub end of the switch. (Note: we’ve also used branches from the ground. Just watch to see that they don’t catch fire or the kids will get an extra thrill.)

Snip off a half-inch corner of the bag and, using it as a pastry tube, extrude the dough onto the hot switch, turning the switch with one hand to wrap the dough around it, snake fashion. Keep turning the switch and move it immediately to the hottest part of the fire. When the dough sets, plant the heavy end of the switch in the ground, turning occasionally to avoid burning. It will take about 20 minutes to bake.

For bannock: flatten into a ball of dough, grease the pan, let it get hot, and put the ball into the pan. Flatten it with a spoon to make a half-inch pie with a 2-inch hole in the center. Flip a couple of times.

Glo
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
Bamber Lake
Sometimes I enjoy breakfast better than dinner. Throw the cast iron skillet on some coals and cook some bacon, then eggs in the grease.. meanwhile keep that coffee perculator on some nearby coals. Cant go wrong doing dinner in a cast iron dutch oven either. A little more to clean, but meats and veggies come out perfect.
 

glowordz

Explorer
Jan 19, 2009
585
8
SC
www.gloriarepp.com
Sometimes I enjoy breakfast better than dinner. Throw the cast iron skillet on some coals and cook some bacon, then eggs in the grease.. meanwhile keep that coffee perculator on some nearby coals. Cant go wrong doing dinner in a cast iron dutch oven either. A little more to clean, but meats and veggies come out perfect.

You got it! Definitely for breakfast too. I'd rather cook in cast iron --properly seasoned-- than anything else. And FWIW there's all that healthful iron that leaches into the food. :)

Glo
 

grendel

Explorer
Feb 24, 2006
561
2
Fredericksburg VA
Anyone ever cook sausage, peppers and onions in the woods? The smell carries for miles. It's one of our regular meals on canoe trips. When backpacking I keep it simple, cous cous and a pack of salmon or tortillas, tuna and cheese= tuna melts. Last week we camped on the river and caught some nice bass and catfish. I filleted them alive and had them frying over the fire with some fries within minutes. A little malt vinegar and a cold beer.....Fresh fish is like a whole other thing from store bought. Unbelievable.
 

Furball1

Explorer
Dec 11, 2005
378
1
Florida
Richard Proenneke

Ummmm,ummmmm,ummmmmm. Man, pork frying in the woods, whether it's sausage or bacon, carries for miles and makes you smile, no matter how grumpy you are in the morning! Ever watch the man in the wilderness series? The guy who thought he'd live in his rustic cabin and live off the land in Alaska for a year and it turned into 35 years? His name was Richard Proenneke. My favorite parts are when he worked wonders with wood, and when he cooked. "Fresh Trout and home fries for breakfast this morning" or "sheep's liver and onions for dinner tonight". Man that guy lived to be in his 80's, looked healthy as a horse. He was an enigma of the 20th century. Wonderful stuff.
 

Old Crazy

Explorer
Oct 13, 2007
481
92
Stinking Creek, NJ
Before I hiked the Appalachian Trail I tested over 100 recipes for dinner and breakfast and chose what I thought were the best ones. Each recipe had to be non-perishable, weigh no more than 12 oz for a supper meal, and only need a minimal amount of fuel to cook. The only ingredients I had to provide on the trail to prepare these meals was water and in some cases, squeeze parkay. If anybody is interested I'd be happy to post some of those recipes here.
 

glowordz

Explorer
Jan 19, 2009
585
8
SC
www.gloriarepp.com
Before I hiked the Appalachian Trail I tested over 100 recipes for dinner and breakfast and chose what I thought were the best ones. Each recipe had to be non-perishable, weigh no more than 12 oz for a supper meal, and only need a minimal amount of fuel to cook. The only ingredients I had to provide on the trail to prepare these meals was water and in some cases, squeeze parkay. If anybody is interested I'd be happy to post some of those recipes here.

Please do! Any that are high in protein would be especially useful.

Glo
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
Bamber Lake
Some good meals mentioned here. Just remember its safe down here, but not a good bet cooking the elaborate meals in bear country, especially after dark. Thats all I could think of while reading some of these.
 

Old Crazy

Explorer
Oct 13, 2007
481
92
Stinking Creek, NJ
glowordz, here's a hew for ya'.





Chicken or Shrimp Hawaiian (12oz)

Package #1
¼ cup roasted cashews

Package #2
½ tbs onion soup powder
¾ cup Uncle Ben’s 10 minute rice
2tbs powdered chicken gravy
1 cup noodles
1/4th cup dehydrated onions
1/4th cup dehydrated mushrooms
¼ cup dried pineapple

Package #3
7oz foil pack of chicken or shrimp

Camp Ingredients
2 ½ cups water
Squeeze parkay to taste

Cook Time
Boil: 4 minutes
Simmer: 12-15 minutes

Cooking Directions
Put 2 ½ cups water and desired amount of parkay in a cook pot and bring to a slow boil for 4 minutes. Reduce heat to simmer for 12-15 minutes. Add Cashews and serve.





Chicken & Dumplings (11 oz)

Package #1
1 heaping tbs dry chicken soup powder
1/3 cup dehydrated vegetables
1/8 cup dry scalloped potatoes broken into small pieces
1 tbs scalloped potato cheese
½ cup egg noodles
½ tsp garlic powder
1 pinch salt

Package #2
1/8 cup corn meal
1/8 cup white flour
1/8 cup milk powder
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp Molly McButter sprinkles
2 pinces salt
1 pinch black pepper

Package #3
7oz foil pack chicken

Camp Ingredients
2 cups water
1 squirt parkay

Cook Time
Boil: 3 minutes
Simmer: 10 minutes

Cooking Directions
Add package #1 to 2 cups water boil for 3 minutes. Turn heat down to a very low simmer. In a separate container, add 1 squirt parkay and enough water to package #2 (approx 1/8 cup) and mix into a bread dough consistency. Form dough into 4 dumplings and place in cook pot. Cover and simmer very low for 10 minutes.




Turkey Dinner (12oz)

Package #1
2 tsp turkey gravy powder
1 tsp dried onion
2 tsp dried mushroom
2 tsp dried celery
3 pinches black pepper
2 pinches salt
1/8 cup dried corn

Package #2
1 ½ cups turkey stuffing
2/3 cups potato flakes
1 tbs dried milk

Package #3
7oz foil pack turkey (or can if foil pack is not available)

Camp Ingredients
2 cups water
3 squirts parkay
1 tsp vegetable oil (optional)

Cook Time
Boil: 3 minutes
Simmer: 5 minutes

Cooking Directions
Add package #1 and 1 squirt parkay to 2 cups water and bring to a boil for 3 minutes. Add package #3 (turkey meat) Simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add package #2. Stir and cover for 5 minutes. Add 2 squirts parkay and stir.




Peanut Chicken Stew (10oz)

Package #1
2 tbs dried chicken soup powder
2 tbs dried onion
¼ cup dehydrated carrot
1/3 cup Uncle Ben’s 10 minute rice
2 pinches salt
1 pinch cayenne pepper powder

Package #2
3.5 oz foil pack chicken meat

Package #3
1/3 cup creamy peanut butter

Camp Ingredients
2 cups water

Cook Time
Boil: 1 minute
Simmer: 14 minutes

Cooking Directions
Add package #1 and package #2 to 2 cups water and boil for 1 minute. Simmer covered for 10 minutes. Add package #3 (peanut butter) and simmer 4 minutes.
 

grendel

Explorer
Feb 24, 2006
561
2
Fredericksburg VA
Some good meals mentioned here. Just remember its safe down here, but not a good bet cooking the elaborate meals in bear country, especially after dark. Thats all I could think of while reading some of these.

If a bear is gonna get you ,it's gonna get you. They can smell a gronola bar just as well as fish frying. might as well eat hearty.
 
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