Hiking Greenwood Forest WMA?

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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I wonder why the coverage is so spotty? Perhaps elevation changes where depressions get skipped over? Hard to tell without a topo overlay.
I use to occasionally blunder into distressed lost folks in the woods and woul kindly lead them out.That never happens anymore,I think every one has GPS except Gabe and NJCHILE.
 
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Gibby

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Apr 4, 2011
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Teegate, pointed out to me that even though you may not be able to speak to someone, you may still be able to text even though there is no signal. I have climbed trees several times to get a better signal in several of the "remote" places or as I call them the black holes. Most of the time I leave my phone in the vehicle and as of lately I only use my handheld when I am looking for a specific location for the first time or need a bearing for the quickest way out. My reliance on technology has slowly dwindled as I spend more time in the woods. I can't explain why.
 

46er

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Mar 24, 2004
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This seems like a good spot for this. And no, I don't usually take a GPS, at least not here in NJ. No cell phone either.

"Contact with the outside world, has given me human distemper."
This quote has been ascribed to Noah John Rondeau, the fabled hermit and self-appointed Mayor of Cold River City.
Rondeau understood that when a man goes into the wilderness he may well be on his own, but he's never actually alone. A man always brings along with him a unique piece of his past, and in that regard, Rondeau was very comfortable in his own skin.
When man takes to the woods, he is not actually escaping civilization, he is striving to recapture a piece of his past. We have become so conditioned to our ordinary, organized existence in a civilized, orderly society, that we've forgotten how to act and react when we are cut loose in a natural world.
Mankind has existed is a natural state for nearly 99 percent of our existence. Yet when campers claim they go to the woods to "get away from it all," they don't realize the journey is actually an attempt to return to a more familiar place and time. The purpose of the journey is not to escape, it is actually reclamation.
We don't go to the woods to lose, we go to find and recover. It often seems to be an intangible notion until we consider the fact that mankind has existed in a "civilized manner" for less than 1 percent of the time we have lived on this planet.
It is an undeniable fact that nature is in our nature, and we are simply one of the more refined animals (although the jury may still be out on that theory.)
Wilderness travel provides humans with an opportunity to realize that nature remain a key component of their being, and that is good for them and not against them. The benefits of nature should no longer be a foreign notion.
Humans should be able to slip into the natural world comfortably and easily, like a well-worn moccasin. They can return to a time when their lives depended on a comprehensive knowledge of the natural world.
But it often seems we have lost that way and there are now far too many artificial elements blocking our way along the route along that old familiar path.
The path to camp leads through our soul, and the sooner we come to recognize that fact, the easier it will be to return, time and again, to sharpen our skills, restore our senses and rekindle the natural fire that continues to burn deep inside all of us.
 
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NJChileHead

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Dec 22, 2011
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Fair enough, but you have not been asking the kind of questions that NJChile has , like where the "trails" are and the " confusing web of sand roads". ;)
Boyd,

Thank you for all that you have shared so far on this thread and on other threads.

I made this thread because I am interested in exploring a 30 000 acre area that I am unfamiliar with, and was wondering if others could give me a frame of reference for the location. It is quite possible that I would not be alone, but I will still be the person who is planning the outing and will therefore be responsible for the hike not turning into an impromptu camping trip.

I was planning to use a map and compass. I do not yet have a GPS. I enjoy the use of the map and compass and would like to hone and improve the skill. Just to clarify, I never took an argumentative stance against GPS use or your position on it, nor did I disregard it. Not answering your question was an oversight on my part, not intentional. Based on what you and Al have said, I will give more serious consideration to picking up a GPS.

I appreciate, and am thankful for, all of the good advice that has been given on here. Quite a lot of wisdom has been shared by people who are much more experienced than I with the outdoors, and I take this advice as being golden.

I do think that it merits careful consideration on my part as to why, with how much I love being outdoors, I do not explore more spontaneously with immersion as pointed out. That being said, there is a lot for me to learn, and at times I feel comfortable taking smaller steps or being more prudent in my planning of the trips, hence the questions in my opening post.
 
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Boyd

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Sorry if I sounded critical, it really wasn't my intention. My only thought is that carrying a GPS would address many of the concerns you have voiced in this thread and others. Of course, it's a personal thing and there are many reasons why someone wouldn't want one. I just felt that it would help with the things you need: such as planning the trip in advance and giving you confidence that you won't get lost along the way. It's also handy to mark locations you might wish to return to in the future or share your finds here with other forum members.

Anyway, it's all good. Just get out there and enjoy the Pines. We all have our own ways of doing that. :)
 

Teegate

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NJChileHead,

The Greenwood Forest extends into Howardsville so if you like walking remote dirt roads take the loop at the below links.

Drive to here on Howardsville Road and park. Come in off of 72.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.80987943597046&lng=-74.36756014823914&z=17&type=h&gpx=

Walk into the field and check out what the state did to the town. Nothing left. Then follow the edge of the field and walk to here and take the road into the woods.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.810299756472794&lng=-74.36331421136856&z=19&type=h&gpx=

Go to this intersection and turn left and loop around to the reservoir.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.80922628577661&lng=-74.35845136642456&z=19&type=h&gpx=

The reservoir.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.81699157199388&lng=-74.3660044670105&z=16&type=h&gpx=

Then back through the town to your car.

Guy
 
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NJChileHead

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Dec 22, 2011
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Sorry if I sounded critical, it really wasn't my intention. My only thought is that carrying a GPS would address many of the concerns you have voiced in this thread and others. Of course, it's a personal thing and there are many reasons why someone wouldn't want one. I just felt that it would help with the things you need: such as planning the trip in advance and giving you confidence that you won't get lost along the way. It's also handy to mark locations you might wish to return to in the future or share your finds here with other forum members.

Anyway, it's all good. Just get out there and enjoy the Pines. We all have our own ways of doing that. :)
Oh man no worries, I suppose I feel a little sheepish at times about being a newbie with folks who have a lot more experience than I do. I certainly would like to pick up a GPS in the future-all of the points that you made definitely point to a need for one as I explore deeper. Regarding getting out and enjoying the pines, I was just out on Saturday and can't wait to get out again. Guess I can't get enough. Thanks!
 

NJChileHead

Explorer
Dec 22, 2011
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NJChileHead,

The Greenwood Forest extends into Howardsville so if you like walking remote dirt roads take the loop at the below links.

Drive to here on Howardsville Road and park. Come in off of 72.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.80987943597046&lng=-74.36756014823914&z=17&type=h&gpx=

Walk into the field and check out what the state did to the town. Nothing left. Then follow the edge of the field and walk to here and take the road into the woods.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.810299756472794&lng=-74.36331421136856&z=19&type=h&gpx=

Go to this intersection and turn left and loop around to the reservoir.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.80922628577661&lng=-74.35845136642456&z=19&type=h&gpx=

The reservoir.

http://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.81699157199388&lng=-74.3660044670105&z=16&type=h&gpx=

Then back through the town to your car.

Guy

Teegate, awesome suggestion and breakdown! That will give me a good intro to the area-this is a great help. Thank you! I owe you one.
 

manumuskin

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Jul 20, 2003
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as a funny story related to 46er's hermit post.
When I was ten years in fifth grade we had to do a report on what we wanted to be when we grew up.I did a report on why I wanted to be a Hermit.I got an A+.At the next family teacher conference which was like the next day my teacher handed the report to my Mom and my Mom was embarrassed that I wanted to be a hermit.(I was an odd child) The teacher explained I gave very good reasons for wanting to be a hermit and that she thought it was a great report.To this day i wish I had that report.I can't remember what I wrote on it.I'd still like to be a hermit but I'd have to take my wife with me.I knew nothing of those things when I was ten and thought girls were quite unnecessary:)
 

manumuskin

Piney
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if you watched the video on the link above I coulda swore he was Australian but he said the sun is to the south at noon.If he was an Aussie it should be north at noon or straight overhead in northern Australia.He must be a Brit.Country looked more like Britain anyway.
 

manumuskin

Piney
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http://www.naturalnavigator.com/find-your-way-using/plants
This is very true in the Barrens.You can use trees in the middle of the woods,pine and oak work best.The heaviest and most horizontal branches tend to be on the south SE sides and the more vertical limbs reaching for the sun are on the north side.You can also use trees out in the middle of fields,you cannot use trees along roads or field edges because they are going to reach into the opening no matter which direction because more sun is there.Also the tips of small trees Cedar especially and many small flowering plants tend to follow the sun even when it's cloudy so they will swing from se to sw over the course of the day,they tend to lag a little behind the sun since plants usually can't move very fast.
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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millville nj
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another way in the barrens is paying attention to mass tree falls.Do not pay attention to single downed trees since they may have just fell over in any direction but if you see many trees in an area and they are all pointing one direction chances are they are pointing east or southeast.Most of our bad storms are winter storms out of the west and northwest and though it was summer the Derecho also came from the west and if you notice in this area and particuarly out near Boyd there are many mass blowdowns where the trees all point east.We occasionally get noreasters too but they usually bring more rain then strong wind.Most of our wind events are from the west and NW.
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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I watched all these vids.The guy is kind of dry but he does put the basics out.
Tell you what Chile ,if we can figure out a time around my obscenely dehumanizing schedule I'll meet you in the barrens and give you a quick orienteering course with map and compass if your still having problems with it.Most of the guys in army boot camp find their most difficult thing to learn is basic Land Nav. On finding out I already knew the stuff they had me teach it.The only thing I had to learn in the military was their UTM coord system and how to read a grid and call for fire.You won't need to know all that though :)If you do get a GPS I can help you with that beast to.If you get a garmin you can download Boyd's map.I have a Magellan and make my own maps for it.Magellan is a more complicated beast but is a very good GPS once you figure it out but there is no tech support whatsoever so your on your own,of course I'll help if you go that route:)
 

Teegate

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Boyd

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I have a Magellan and make my own maps for it.Magellan is a more complicated beast but is a very good GPS once you figure it out but there is no tech support whatsoever so your on your own,of course I'll help if you go that route:)
That route has changed a bit. Magellan now has a completely new line of handhelds, the eXplorist 310/510/610/710 that are not compatible with the maps from their older models. I was asked if I was interested in a creating some free maps for Magellan as part of a company initiative with GPSFileDepot and (thinking of you of course :)) I said "Sure, it would be easy to convert my NJ maps and I even have a Triton" (which I do, although I don't use it). I was told, "Sorry, the new map creation software doesn't support the Triton series." Evidently this has something to do with software licenses and the acquisition of Magellan by MITAC a few years ago. On Garmin, I can make a map that will work on units they were selling 12 years ago right through the current models.

You can still get new Tritons, but IMO it's not a very good investment. National Geographic has also discontinued their TOPO! series which was pretty nice on the Triton. Basically, the Triton has become a family of orphans. Doesn't reflect very well on the company... :(
 

NJChileHead

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Dec 22, 2011
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Hey Al,

First, thanks so much for the vids, links, and the info! This is very helpful and these are great resources for me. I am always interested in learning more about any facet of navigation, wilderness survival, geology, ecology, etc.

Second,

I watched all these vids.The guy is kind of dry but he does put the basics out.
Tell you what Chile ,if we can figure out a time around my obscenely dehumanizing schedule I'll meet you in the barrens and give you a quick orienteering course with map and compass if your still having problems with it.Most of the guys in army boot camp find their most difficult thing to learn is basic Land Nav. On finding out I already knew the stuff they had me teach it.The only thing I had to learn in the military was their UTM coord system and how to read a grid and call for fire.You won't need to know all that though :)If you do get a GPS I can help you with that beast to.If you get a garmin you can download Boyd's map.I have a Magellan and make my own maps for it.Magellan is a more complicated beast but is a very good GPS once you figure it out but there is no tech support whatsoever so your on your own,of course I'll help if you go that route:)
Yes, and hell yes. I'd love to pick your brain about orienteering!