Lock's Bridge

GermanG

Piney
Apr 2, 2005
1,035
277
1,063
Little Egg Harbor
I'm thinking I'm getting closer to the origin of this stone. The straight line still doesn't seem natural.
View attachment 6558
I placed the straight edge on it just as a reference. I also pointed to the other line that if continued on would be parallel. The other stones I found there were relitvely brittle. My original thought of it being slag was based on the fact that it was just dumped there and used as fill. If it was useful in any way they wouldn't have wasted energy to dispose of it. Could this possibly be the byproduct of a stone cutting operation. I know there can't be many around here but this kind of makes sense. When cutting tiles on my wet saw I wind up with a layer of sludge that if I let dry would look just like the tile just more brittle. Could this be the byproduct of cutting brownstone? Stone dust as opposed to saw dust?
I can see why one might suspect that, but it is important to remember that ironstone is a sedimentary rock, formed by sediments being put down in layers. These layers often have bands that contrast in color and and density, causing different rates of erosion over time. A denser band of sediment would then project from the softer surrounding minerals. The layers are most often wavy, but being as straight as in your sample isn't unusual, given how it is formed. That being said, I've learned to never say never!
 
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smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
I can see why one might suspect that, but it is important to remember that ironstone is a sedimentary rock, formed by sediments being put down in layers. These layers often have bands that contrast in color and and density, causing different rates of erosion over time. A denser band of sediment would then project from the softer surrounding minerals. The layers are most often wavy, but being as straight as in your sample isn't unusual, given how it is formed. That being said, I've learned to never say never!
I agree. I can't say that this can't be formed naturally but to me it just seems unlikely. In an area that stone is a rare commodity I find it hard to believe that this wasn't used to build up a foundation. Instead it was dumped to help build up a dam. Between this and the lines in it just seems to me that there's more to this story and could possibly help answer some questions about Lock Bridge area.
If not I just might have a funny looking stone:)
 
Apr 6, 2004
3,116
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Galloway
SmokeJumper,

There were buildings at Estelle's Mill, so it is certainly possible that these stones were taken from the foundations and used as fill for the new raceway (or channel).

Rest assured that ironstone with straight lines/ridges/grooves are abundant in hilly areas.
 
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Tracker Jim

Scout
Dec 18, 2014
94
72
18
Leeds Point NJ
Since we know that the mill was in ruins in the early 1790's when the Atsion Co. Improved the dam, and rebuilt the lock, I had been considering the possibility that any ironstone that was utilized in the construction of the old mill may have been repurposed in the reconstruction of the lock.

The location of all those bits of ironstone seem to be concentrated right at the head of the canal or race and at the foot of the pond and embedded in both sides of the canal. There doesn't appear to be throughout the length of the canal though. I was imagining that the concentration of stone at that location could mark the lower gate of a "pound lock" system. The upper gate being where the bridge is and the pond, the "chamber" where the boats were raised and lowered by adjusting the water level between the upper and lower gates.

I'm thinking that if there was a mechanism built into the 1765 dam that provided the means for the passage of boats as was suggested by the original legislation, it may have been a simple "flash lock". But when it was reconstructed by the Atsion Co., a more substantial "pound lock" system may have been put in place. This reconstruction may have also wiped out much of the old mill and its infrastructure.
 
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smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
Since we know that the mill was in ruins in the early 1790's when the Atsion Co. Improved the dam, and rebuilt the lock, I had been considering the possibility that any ironstone that was utilized in the construction of the old mill may have been repurposed in the reconstruction of the lock.

The location of all those bits of ironstone seem to be concentrated right at the head of the canal or race and at the foot of the pond and embedded in both sides of the canal. There doesn't appear to be throughout the length of the canal though. I was imagining that the concentration of stone at that location could mark the lower gate of a "pound lock" system. The upper gate being where the bridge is and the pond, the "chamber" where the boats were raised and lowered by adjusting the water level between the upper and lower gates.

I'm thinking that if there was a mechanism built into the 1765 dam that provided the means for the passage of boats as was suggested by the original legislation, it may have been a simple "flash lock". But when it was reconstructed by the Atsion Co., a more substantial "pound lock" system may have been put in place. This reconstruction may have also wiped out much of the old mill and its infrastructure.
I was wondering the possibility of that as well. Or is it just that was simply the location of the mill.
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
913
519
93
59
Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
While to me it looks more like stone, to me it seems like it's definitely man made some how. Whether it's a form of slag something else I'm not sure.
Ironstone comes in a wide variety of shapes and sizes (see below links)


Also see the fifth paragraph in:


During ironstone formation, the soft primordial iron mass will mold to the mud above and below it. This leaves structures called “sole marks.” Let’s say the iron-rich mud is sitting atop an old lake bed that dried up, and that underlying lake-bed mud cracked into polygonal patterns as it desiccated, those desiccation cracks would under gravity be filled by bog ore ooze like cupcake batter. Once hardened, that fissure fill would remain as hardened protrusions that can look remarkably uniform. If the ironstone's substrate was formed under tranquil water conditions, the ironstone bottom would be flat. If the ironstone substrate was formed under turbulent water conditions, the ironstone bottom might be wavy from ripple marks below.

If that ironstone was then exposed above ground during the Ice Age, its surface could have been further modified by wind erosion. Cold dense air poured off the massive Laurentide Ice Sheet, carrying abrasive sand grains and ice crystals that etched rocks, stones, and cobbles into bizarre shapes like flutes, grooves, and scallops. These are called ‘ventifacts,’ wind(venta)-faceted stones. These wind-etched surfaces are often smoothly polished, and can have a glossy coating of silica and/or iron. Ventifacts are found in association with hot and cold deserts all over the world, and on Mars. Have you noticed that, in the Pine Barrens, once river-rounded surface gravel is now often flat-topped?


A paper, "Pleistocene ventifacts and ice-marginal conditions, New Jersey, USA," is in early view for a special palaeoenvironmental reconstruction issue of the international journal Permafrost and Periglacial Processes.


Screen shot 2015-10-29 at 10.41.47 AM.png

I make the argument that ventifacts are widespread features of the Pine Barrens. Their abundance and exquisite forms attest to strong unidirectional winds in the absence of vegetation. For extended periods the Pine Barrens becomes not park-like tundra, not polar-like semidesert, but the region becomes polar-like full desert during the driest and windiest episodes of the Pleistocene.

So is Smoke-Jumper's fragment an upper stone surface that is smoothly polished and wind-etched, or a lower stone surface that is rough and molded into a sole-mark cast?

S-M
 

Don Catts

Explorer
Aug 5, 2012
461
258
63
79
Indian Mills
Since we know that the mill was in ruins in the early 1790's when the Atsion Co. Improved the dam, and rebuilt the lock, I had been considering the possibility that any ironstone that was utilized in the construction of the old mill may have been repurposed in the reconstruction of the lock.

The location of all those bits of ironstone seem to be concentrated right at the head of the canal or race and at the foot of the pond and embedded in both sides of the canal. There doesn't appear to be throughout the length of the canal though. I was imagining that the concentration of stone at that location could mark the lower gate of a "pound lock" system. The upper gate being where the bridge is and the pond, the "chamber" where the boats were raised and lowered by adjusting the water level between the upper and lower gates.

I'm thinking that if there was a mechanism built into the 1765 dam that provided the means for the passage of boats as was suggested by the original legislation, it may have been a simple "flash lock". But when it was reconstructed by the Atsion Co., a more substantial "pound lock" system may have been put in place. This reconstruction may have also wiped out much of the old mill and its infrastructure.

Don't know anything about the Atsion company improving the dam or rebuilding the lock. Do you remember where you read it.
Don
 

smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
Ironstone comes in a wide variety of shapes and sizes (see below links)


Also see the fifth paragraph in:


During ironstone formation, the soft primordial iron mass will mold to the mud above and below it. This leaves structures called “sole marks.” Let’s say the iron-rich mud is sitting atop an old lake bed that dried up, and that underlying lake-bed mud cracked into polygonal patterns as it desiccated, those desiccation cracks would under gravity be filled by bog ore ooze like cupcake batter. Once hardened, that fissure fill would remain as hardened protrusions that can look remarkably uniform. If the ironstone's substrate was formed under tranquil water conditions, the ironstone bottom would be flat. If the ironstone substrate was formed under turbulent water conditions, the ironstone bottom might be wavy from ripple marks below.

If that ironstone was then exposed above ground during the Ice Age, its surface could have been further modified by wind erosion. Cold dense air poured off the massive Laurentide Ice Sheet, carrying abrasive sand grains and ice crystals that etched rocks, stones, and cobbles into bizarre shapes like flutes, grooves, and scallops. These are called ‘ventifacts,’ wind(venta)-faceted stones. These wind-etched surfaces are often smoothly polished, and can have a glossy coating of silica and/or iron. Ventifacts are found in association with hot and cold deserts all over the world, and on Mars. Have you noticed that, in the Pine Barrens, once river-rounded surface gravel is now often flat-topped?


A paper, "Pleistocene ventifacts and ice-marginal conditions, New Jersey, USA," is in early view for a special palaeoenvironmental reconstruction issue of the international journal Permafrost and Periglacial Processes.



I make the argument that ventifacts are widespread features of the Pine Barrens. Their abundance and exquisite forms attest to strong unidirectional winds in the absence of vegetation. For extended periods the Pine Barrens becomes not park-like tundra, not polar-like semidesert, but the region becomes polar-like full desert during the driest and windiest episodes of the Pleistocene.

So is Smoke-Jumper's fragment an upper stone surface that is smoothly polished and wind-etched, or a lower stone surface that is rough and molded into a sole-mark cast?

S-M
Thanks Spung Man
This explains a lot to me. I would definitely say it looks more like a bottom sole-cast. It also looks like the opposite side is eroded pretty well. I didn't take a picture of that side yet. But in the cross section it almost looks like an airplane wing. Like moving water was going across it perpendicular to the lines on the other side. Most of the fragments there were pretty much the size and shape as this one. All roughly an inch thick. I'm going to try and go back and take some pictures and document some other pieces this weekend. Thanks all this has been very infomative to me and my daughter.

P.S if anyone want to see this in person I'd be willing to meet up if it helps to unlock any mysteries of locks bridge.
 
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Apr 6, 2004
3,116
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1,043
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Are we assuming this.
Here ya go:

“That said Henry Drinker and John Drinker about 5 years ago, when the said saw mill and dam commonly called and known by the name of Estells mill on the said Atsion River had decayed and fallen down, about the space of 2 years ago did not rebuild the same mill, but afterwards repaired and kept up the dam thereof, and still do keep up the same and did build there a certain water lock to facilitate the transportation of certain boats up and down the Atsion stream to the utter subversion of said agreement as aforesaid and heretofore subsisting between the aforesaid Charles Read and John Estell and contrary to the spirit and design of said recited act and said defendants by their frequent use of said lock in drawing the water constantly, twice of thrice a week, instead of 3 or 4 times a year as formerly in the time of John Estell, this Complainants ore beds below said lock are frequently hindered in their business by the flow of water, owing partly to the junction of the Mechescatuxen stream with the Atsion stream by means of the canal, aforesaid and multiplying thereby the waters in Atsion Stream, in so much, that the said frequent use of said lock by the defendants amounts to a prohibition to the works at Batsto and also to the subtraction of the waters of the Mechescatuxen Branch, to the injury of the Complainants mill seat.”
 

Don Catts

Explorer
Aug 5, 2012
461
258
63
79
Indian Mills
Here ya go:

“That said Henry Drinker and John Drinker about 5 years ago, when the said saw mill and dam commonly called and known by the name of Estells mill on the said Atsion River had decayed and fallen down, about the space of 2 years ago did not rebuild the same mill, but afterwards repaired and kept up the dam thereof, and still do keep up the same and did build there a certain water lock to facilitate the transportation of certain boats up and down the Atsion stream to the utter subversion of said agreement as aforesaid and heretofore subsisting between the aforesaid Charles Read and John Estell and contrary to the spirit and design of said recited act and said defendants by their frequent use of said lock in drawing the water constantly, twice of thrice a week, instead of 3 or 4 times a year as formerly in the time of John Estell, this Complainants ore beds below said lock are frequently hindered in their business by the flow of water, owing partly to the junction of the Mechescatuxen stream with the Atsion stream by means of the canal, aforesaid and multiplying thereby the waters in Atsion Stream, in so much, that the said frequent use of said lock by the defendants amounts to a prohibition to the works at Batsto and also to the subtraction of the waters of the Mechescatuxen Branch, to the injury of the Complainants mill seat.”
Thanks pinelandpaddler, sometimes I can make doubting Thomas look like a true dream believer.
 

smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
Ok last picture of this stone. I promise:D
This is the top side that to me looks like it's very worn from either wind or water.
image.jpg
I still like the Historic Stucco theory:)
 
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smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
We spent some time at Locks today exploring. At the bridge there does seem to be some wood that may be older then the bridge. We also explored downstream a bit. All the rest of the stones seemed more natural forming then the one I picked up. I did find wood throughout the area but most of it seemed newer, making me believe that maybe the other half of the bridge could have been washed out and scattered about.
image.jpg
Exploring downstream of the bridge I did find some pieces that seemed much older then the bridge though some had more modern nails in them.
image.jpg
But this piece seemed very old to me and it was rotted away in the center and had no smell of creosote from the pieces in side. This was located downstream of the bridge almost parallel to the piles of ironstone and seems to have a lot of gravel around.
image.jpg
And
image.jpg
These pieces either washed downstream or there was something more built there.
 
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smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
Those pieces of wood were part of the bridge.
I figured so. Judging by the nails in them. There was also a board right at the "spring" that was laying flat and sticking out of the ground that looked like it was pushed over long ago when the bridge was built. Here you can see it a bit sticking out of the ground just above the water.
image.jpg
 

smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
After spending some time out here a couple of weeks ago I've made a new discovery. Just upstream from Locks is the beach we usually visit. With the recent beaver activity the currents have drastically changed. It's eroding from the beach much more now, exposing the clay along the bank. In about a foot of water we found two half bricks. One looked very old, like it was poured into a mold with the top being rough. I'm not sure if they were recently exposed or came down from upstream some how. Any thoughts?
 
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Tracker Jim

Scout
Dec 18, 2014
94
72
18
Leeds Point NJ
After spending some time out here a couple of weeks ago I've made a new discovery. Just upstream from Locks is the beach we usually visit. With the recent beaver activity the currents have drastically changed. It's eroding from the beach much more now, exposing the clay along the bank. In about a foot of water we found two half bricks. One looked very old, like it was poured into a mold with the top being rough. I'm not sure if they were recently exposed or came down from upstream some how. Any thoughts?
Smoke,
I suppose that it could be possible that the bricks you found may have originated from one of the following structures that we know once existed at this location: Good dwelling house; 15 horse stable; two houses for the sawyers; other out buildings; and a good well. Of course there is also the saw mill itself, but I believe that it was located a below the beach you mentioned; even a bit below the remains of the bridge. Nice find!
 

smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,125
572
1,093
Atco, NJ
Smoke,
I suppose that it could be possible that the bricks you found may have originated from one of the following structures that we know once existed at this location: Good dwelling house; 15 horse stable; two houses for the sawyers; other out buildings; and a good well. Of course there is also the saw mill itself, but I believe that it was located a below the beach you mentioned; even a bit below the remains of the bridge. Nice find!
I've never noticed anything in that location before. It seems relatively untouched especially with the clays deposits there. I also thought the structures would have been further downstream as well. I find it a little hard to believe they made it down stream from Atsion naturally. Human envolvemeent can't be ruled out but they did look like they were under water for a long time.