New ORV Plan Ideas

NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
I must have missed the details. “Off-Roading” is Illegal! Which roads on the attached map are the vehicles being illegally driven on in Wharton State Forest?

AFA1119F-56DD-452F-9923-7B2B38565C2E.png
 

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  • N J Wharton State Forest Motorized Access Plan Map.pdf
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  • NJ Wharton State Forest Motorized Access Plan.pdf
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Last edited:

NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
You posted an important detail! "... if you were not driving on the yellow-highlighted roads."

Leads to the question: If no physical markers are available for route guidance then how can the driver know they are following the authorized roads?

Hikers have blazes to follow, and flora-fauna enthusiasts have "keep out" signs of areas not to enter.

How does the driver follow the authorized roads without some kind of visible markers and how does the driver know what areas not to enter if no signs are posted.

Has anyone over the years suggested any methods for the eliminating ambiguity?
 
Last edited:

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
23,584
5,507
The map says the yellow lines are the designated routes. Again, this was never implemented so you don't have to deal with this yet. Plus, at least one of the routes shown is already closed by the ignorance of a township.
 
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NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
Based on the current logic then remove the blazes for the hikers and remove the "keep out" signs for the flora and fauna enthusiasts. Let everyone find their own way by what’s shown on the map.
 
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NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
I’m new to this controversial issue (since 2015?), so my comments are based on an outsiders viewpoint. I do camp and hike in the Pinelands once in a while so I enjoy the beauty of what the camping and hiking areas have to offer.
 
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imkms

Explorer
Feb 18, 2008
510
131
SJ and SW FL
The comment “launching a permitting system for off-road drivers” has got me worried. I’ve seen permit systems put in place in other states where it was expensive, prohibitive and in some cases only limited to a certain number of permits to be issued. Hopefully, those problems won’t happen here.
 
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NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
Yes, a new set of challenges will become part of enjoying the Pinelands IF permits are required.

"Less Steps Are The Best Steps" in all processes, a.k.a., "Keep It Simple Somehow".

Good for the Goose? Good for the Gander! The regulations should be uniform, IMHO.

During hikes in the Pinelands: I've seen plenty of empty plastic bottles, empty food wrappers, used diapers, and torn clothes discarded along the footpaths.

Adding to the list: live trees with axe/hatchet marks, bark removed, branches sawed off, and with hammered in nails at the campsites.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,373
2,593
Pines; Bamber area
Based on the current logic then remove the blazes for the hikers and remove the "keep out" signs for the flora and fauna enthusiasts. Let everyone find their own way by what’s shown on the map.
There was an overly aggressive campaign by the Pinelands Preservation Alliance to get this done immediately, if not sooner. So, they contacted the Wharton State Forest Supervisor and got him on their side by feeding him horror stories showing where drivers are destroying the environment. A lot of what they were showing him was in fact true. People were leaving the old roads and making their own and tearing up lowlands, where they clearly should not have been if they themselves cared about the environment.

Therefore, there was a squeeze play on either side of us responsible people who love the woods and want all roads to remain open so we can have the same access that has been provided for 100 years. It got out of hand, as the Forest Supervisor with citizen helpers were putting up little signs (that could easily be run over) and cutting trees blocking access to long-standing roads. So, we people who use the roads responsibly contacted their legislative representatives and saved the day. That map is now on the scrap heap, where it belongs.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
12,373
2,593
Pines; Bamber area
Yes, a new set of challenges will become part of enjoying the Pinelands IF permits are required.

"Less Steps Are The Best Steps" in all processes, a.k.a., "Keep It Simple Somehow".

Good for the Goose? Good for the Gander! The regulations should be uniform, IMHO.

During hikes in the Pinelands: I've seen plenty of empty plastic bottles, empty food wrappers, used diapers, and torn clothes discarded along the footpaths.

Adding to the list: live trees with axe/hatchet marks, bark removed, branches sawed off, and with hammered in nails at the campsites.

I agree 100%, people in general are irresponsible. The worst to me, is people who feel it's cute to put kitschy crap on the trees and the side of the path; like doll heads, stuffed animals, painted rocks, and homemade signs. Let the woods be the woods, that is what most of us want and why we go out there; to leave civilization behind for a few hours.
 
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NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
There was an overly aggressive campaign by the Pinelands Preservation Alliance to get this done immediately, if not sooner. So, they contacted the Wharton State Forest Supervisor and got him on their side by feeding him horror stories showing where drivers are destroying the environment. A lot of what they were showing him was in fact true. People were leaving the old roads and making their own and tearing up lowlands, where they clearly should not have been if they themselves cared about the environment.

Therefore, there was a squeeze play on either side of us responsible people who love the woods and want all roads to remain open so we can have the same access that has been provided for 100 years. It got out of hand, as the Forest Supervisor with citizen helpers were putting up little signs (that could easily be run over) and cutting trees blocking access to long-standing roads. So, we people who use the roads responsibly contacted their legislative representatives and saved the day. That map is now on the scrap heap, where it belongs.
You're totally on the mark.

I appreciate you sharing a few of the details so I can better understand the situation. Maybe I'll travel to one of the offices (Atsion or Batsto) this weekend to ask for all of the official public maps and literature of all permitted activities in Wharton State Forest to obtain the "up to date" information.

Thank you!
 
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Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
23,584
5,507
So, we people who use the roads responsibly contacted their legislative representatives and saved the day. That map is now on the scrap heap, where it belongs.

Bob is correct, many people worked hard to make this happen. All of them deserve quite a bit of credit. In that group was one unsung hero who without a doubt turned that fiasco from a certain loss into a big time win. When he first pitched the idea to me I was stunned at what he said, and sure enough his idea worked. Within weeks town meetings were all the rage and the DEP was struggling to keep up. Eventually, they ran out of steam. It is now 6 years later and most people have no idea that because of him we can enjoy the woods as before. I thanked him the last time I saw him and will do it again whenever I see him in the future.
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
8,124
1,980
57
millville nj
www.youtube.com
all those yellow roads are the sissy roads.If the road is on topo it's legitimate,of course half of those are gone and there are some new roads that are totally viable,well used and occasionally maintained.
 

NJCoastal

Scout
Oct 19, 2021
34
11
66
Mount Laurel, NJ
all those yellow roads are the sissy roads. If the road is on topo it's legitimate, of course half of those are gone and there are some new roads that are totally viable, well used and occasionally maintained.
Hence, one of the reasons why I'm going to visit one of the offices to obtain the "up to date" map and regulations. I traveled on the Trans New Jersey Trail, from Brendan T Byrne State Forest to Batsto Rd near Batsto Village last weekend. Brendan T Byrne SF to Quaker Bridge was relatively easy in my compact SUV 4WD, but Quaker Bridge to Batsto (along Goodwater Road) was a little more interesting. Time in the outdoors, not matter how easy or difficult, is time well spent.
 
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