Pine Barrens Beer

nowashburn

New Member
Jan 10, 2010
11
0
1
Folsom, NJ
Spung-man,

Thanks for such great tips and references. I just called the Hammonton library and they are looking into getting the book "The Early Breweries of New Jersey". Apparently, its pretty hard to get and I only found it for sale online for a whooping 75 dollars! How did the Raw licorice addition taste?
 

turtle

Explorer
Feb 4, 2009
631
164
43
a village...in the pines
"Spung juice" "PPA-IPA" "Blind Buzz Brew" "Dark Water Stout" .......This is easier than naming the guinea pig.....

I made some fine liquor' myself yesterday. Ready for early March......

turtle
 

LARGO

Piney
Sep 7, 2005
1,518
57
1,028
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Pestletown
One name.... Mulliner's
One flavor to incorporate... Charcoal
One thing agreed to include... actual alcohol

Peace out.

g.
 
Dec 22, 2009
10
0
1
How fortunate that you can brew your own. Frau Stolzfus had a conniption when I suggested it. What kind of Pennsylvania Deitsch does that make me? No bier?
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
28
Bamber Lake
Keep the fruits, nuts and flakes in California.
What? California? Way before brewers used hops various fruits, vegetables, and other plants were used for brewing. There are a variety of well known, and well liked I might add, beers that are brewed with these ingredients. Many wheat beers brew with a hint of rasberry or other fruits (I dont like them too fruity, but just a hint adds a good character). A good blueberry or blackberry ale (again, some are way too sweet) makes a great summer beer. I too enjoy lambics, especially belgian lambic framboise (the rasberry one). How about flakes of oatmeal? Have you seen the ingredients in seasonal beers and ales? Nut brown ales have also been around much longer than Budweiser or Yuengling lagers (even though bud is a far fetched lager). If we are just posting preferences here, I am advocating for exploring a new tasting beer to represent the pines, not another bud or yuengling. You can brew something that tastes like them from a cheap brew set sold at Bed Bath and Beyond.
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
28
Bamber Lake
"Spung juice" "PPA-IPA" "Blind Buzz Brew" "Dark Water Stout" .......This is easier than naming the guinea pig.....

I made some fine liquor' myself yesterday. Ready for early March......

turtle
Hhhm.. what kind did you make? Would you possibly be interested in a homeade red wine trade? A little for a little?
 

nowashburn

New Member
Jan 10, 2010
11
0
1
Folsom, NJ
Good points

What? California? Way before brewers used hops various fruits, vegetables, and other plants were used for brewing. There are a variety of well known, and well liked I might add, beers that are brewed with these ingredients. Many wheat beers brew with a hint of rasberry or other fruits (I dont like them too fruity, but just a hint adds a good character). A good blueberry or blackberry ale (again, some are way too sweet) makes a great summer beer. I too enjoy lambics, especially belgian lambic framboise (the rasberry one). How about flakes of oatmeal? Have you seen the ingredients in seasonal beers and ales? Nut brown ales have also been around much longer than Budweiser or Yuengling lagers (even though bud is a far fetched lager). If we are just posting preferences here, I am advocating for exploring a new tasting beer to represent the pines, not another bud or yuengling. You can brew something that tastes like them from a cheap brew set sold at Bed Bath and Beyond.
good points there. so far we have discussed and came up with some very clever names, ingredient possibilities, and a good amount of history of beer here in the pines. so, lets back up and have a vote on what type of beer we would all like first. Is there any way I can make a poll in this fourm?
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
28
Bamber Lake
good points there. so far we have discussed and came up with some very clever names, ingredient possibilities, and a good amount of history of beer here in the pines. so, lets back up and have a vote on what type of beer we would all like first. Is there any way I can make a poll in this fourm?
Dont remember ever seeing a pole on this site. I've been considering buying the materials to home brew and would enjoy sitting in on the making if you'd like help one weekend. If you took water from a river as some suggested, it might need to be treated unless the brewing temps are high enough to kill bacteria. Dont think anyone would be happy with "beaver fever" no matter how lit they get. We have great well water (treated) here in Bamber if you'd be interested in using that.
 

nowashburn

New Member
Jan 10, 2010
11
0
1
Folsom, NJ
Sounds Great

Dont remember ever seeing a pole on this site. I've been considering buying the materials to home brew and would enjoy sitting in on the making if you'd like help one weekend. If you took water from a river as some suggested, it might need to be treated unless the brewing temps are high enough to kill bacteria. Dont think anyone would be happy with "beaver fever" no matter how lit they get. We have great well water (treated) here in Bamber if you'd be interested in using that.
That sounds like a lot of fun, thanks for the invite. A good way to start is with extract brewing and buying a simple beginners kit. If you dont mind ordering online, I suggest going to northernbrewer.com. Here is a link to their beginner kits:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/starter-kits/basic-starter-kit.html

If you dont like buying online, you can go to the following places in NJ:

Village Tobacco in Berlin Farmers Market, Berlin, NJ
Richland General Store, Richland, NJ
Princeton Homebrew, Trenton, NJ

I obviously have the materials already to brew and we could use my stuff.
 

PINEY MIKE

Explorer
Jan 30, 2009
707
25
28
Bamber Lake
I had a cheap brewing kit a while back, but the batch tasted like keystone light or similar. I dont mind any beer really, but if Im putting the time and effort into the making, I'd rather do a nice porter or ale type of beer. We've been making backyard wine for almost 5 years now that comes out great. We crush and press the grapes, and bottle it ourselves. Im suprised I didnt start brewing first, but we had friends who were really into wine. Keep me posted on plans.
 
Apr 6, 2004
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Galloway
I have long wanted to brew an Atlantic White Cedar ale. I did once attempt to do this, but it was a failure. :cry: I think the main characteristic I would look for in a cedar beer is the cedar aroma. I'd like to open a bottle and be reminded of the cedar scents that one might smell while paddling down a Pine Barrens river on a Spring day. Perhaps some fresh sprouted cedar sprigs would impart the desired aroma/flavor. Perhaps some cedar berries? Or maybe some fresh cedar wood chips? Or perhaps even age the beer in a cedar cask?

Another idea I've played around with is brewing a pine ale or lager (Pitch Pine Pilsener?) As mentioned here already, hops can go a long way in producing piney flavors. However, I would again look for a piney aroma more than anything, one that captures the sweet smell of pitch pine resins on a hot summer day. I wonder if the pitch pines oils and resins could actually be used in a beer?
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
912
518
93
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Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
Pray tell, what brew pairs with this menu?

Keep the fruits, nuts and flakes in California.
Down-to-the-Carrot… Ah, does anyone remember this local eatery (in Pomona, next to the bar once endearingly called Quigley Mansion)? I was cleaning files and found this relict of Stockton State College primeval. My acquaintance with the establishment is purely adventitious. Out in the wilds of Milmay lived a rather interesting family who homesteaded along a lonely dirt track that linked Milmay with Hesstown. Their habitation, too far removed for any hope of electrical hook-up, was built upon the lost-lots of Osborne Village. This forgotten settlement (c.1890-1915) was named for Reverend Joseph Taylor’s daughter. One of backsettler “Fat Freddy’s” sons had a serious crush on a free-spirited hirsute waitress at Down-to-the-Carrot, so guess where we would end upon a Friday night! So towards in truth-of-advertising, Billy Beer, Hop’N Gator (Gatorade-enhanced swill), Fox Head 400 (Eastern Brewing Co., Hammonton), and Canadian Ace (Eastern Brewing Co., Hammonton –Capone’s old brand!) were all customary elements of the 1970’s Pinelands gastronomical milieu. Can you say veggie-burger, please… with fruit beer?

Spung-Man
 

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