Pointing to Folsom

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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I would beg to differ.Folsom is in the Barrens,just not in the core protection area.There are many that would say Cumberland county west of the Maurice river at least is not in the barrens and much of it is more oak the pine but there are patches of woods here that are as barrens as anything in the core area just smaller.The woods lie over the same aquifer and that aquifer is what makes the barrens barren.The fast subsiding of water through the sands creates xeric habitat when just a few feet above a vast resevoir of water but drop the surface down within a foot of that water and watch out the plant diversity increases.Soil is what makes the barrens,not necessarily the abundance of pine over oak or cedar over maple.Our activities have altered much of the vegetation but as long as that sand is there if we leave well enough alone it would all become barrens again.probably fry us in the process though.
 

Spung-Man

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Folsom certainly is in the Pine Barrens, is designated a Pinelands Village, and was the first "modern" ethnic settlement in the Pines (c.1848). Originally known as New Germany, the name was later changed to honor President Cleveland when they broke away from Buena Vista Township in 1906. He was the second heaviest president, although at 250 lbs. and 5'11" his weight doesn't seem extreme by today's standards. It was "body by Bud." Cleveland endeared himself to the German community by hanging out in beer parlors, consuming vast amounts of German lager. Locals had an alternate name for the hamlet, the derogatory "Woolytown" for the seemingly-strange wild-and-wooly foreigners who made homes there.

S-M
 

Boyd

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We've have the discussion "what constitutes the pine barrens" a number of times, and there are various ways to define it. For an interesting read, see Howard Boyd's final book, "The Ecological Pine Barrens of New Jersey" where he treats the topic at length.

However, in this case, Folsom is well within the pinelands boundary as defined by the state.

folsom.png
 

dogg57

Piney
Jan 22, 2007
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Southern NJ
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Folsom certainly is in the Pine Barrens, is designated a Pinelands Village, and was the first "modern" ethnic settlement in the Pines (c.1848). Originally known as New Germany, the name was later changed to honor President Cleveland when they broke away from Buena Vista Township in 1906. He was the second heaviest president, although at 250 lbs. and 5'11" his weight doesn't seem extreme by today's standards. It was "body by Bud." Cleveland endeared himself to the German community by hanging out in beer parlors, consuming vast amounts of German lager. Locals had an alternate name for the hamlet, the derogatory "Woolytown" for the seemingly-strange wild-and-wooly foreigners who made homes there.

S-M

Folsom was named for Francis Folsom Cleveland, wife of President Grover Cleveland?
 

Spung-Man

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Geezerfinneran,

For inspiration as to what constitutes the "Pine Barrens," look at the Figure 4 map “Outline of the Pine Barrens” in the introduction to Forman’s classic volume Pine Barrens Ecosystem and Landscape, (page xl). The original was published by botanists McCormick and Andresen (1963) for “The role of Pinus virginiana Mill” in the Audubon Society’s NJ Nature News.

I've added McCormick's boundaries to Boyd's stylized map of the State, which delineated the Pinelands Management Area (PMA). Boyd's map also biases the full extent of the Pines. The PMA does not cover all of South Jersey's Pine Barrens. For example, the PMA protected non-Pine-Barrens land around Marlton and Vincentown (red arrow), but avoided land like the Virginia pine ecosystem near Millville (yellow, at Raceway) and various Pine Barrens outliers (dark green). I share Manumuskin's irk. Overemphasizing the Core Area diminishes the significance of the rest of the Pine Barrens, areas every bit as worthy of our admiration.
Pinelands Delineation.jpeg

S-M
 

Boyd

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Well I wasn't trying to produce a definitive map of the pine barrens, but just threw something together quickly to show that Folsom was in the pines. Interesting points nonetheless! I looked, and I have two different shapefiles representing the pines. Right now I'm not sure of the origin of the one I posted above, but I was most recently using it as a guideline for what LIDAR data to download.

pines01.jpg


The smaller black outline is from NJDEP's data here: http://www.state.nj.us/dep/gis/stateshp.html#PINELAND

This is an ArcView shapefile of the New Jersey Pinelands boundary (PA_Boundary). The Pinelands boundary shapfile was created by digitizing 68 photo quarterquads. The photo quarterquads were then appended together to create the final shapefile (PA_Boundary).

Here's a larger version of the green area that I posted earlier. The state outline in that map might be a little deceptive since it shows the boundary out in the ocean and not the coastline.

pines02.jpg




And the pink area shows the NJDEP data referenced above (the black outline on the little map), so this seems to be what the state considers the "New Jersey Pinelands boundary". Is there a place to download the version you posted Mark?

pines03.jpg
 

Spung-Man

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Richland, NJ
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Boyd,

For this spring's flurry of presentations I digitized and colored layers of the original McCormick/Andreson map in Keynote, Mac's version of PowerPoint. Rick Radis, NJ Audubon, kindly provided the original for me to use in publication and presentation with proper attribution. Because of copyright concerns, I can not distribute the full diagram.

Dogg,

The area in yellow is predominantly Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana), or, as the Virginian's call it, Jersey pine! Its preference is for clayey, stony soil instead of sandy soil. I have gone back and addressed the oversight in the original post.

Cheers,
S-M
 
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manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
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Boyd's map show the political barrens boundaries,down here in cumberland county anyway the physiographic boundary of the barrens stretches well to the southwest of the boundary with an lens of classic barrens habitat out on the salem/cumberland border as well centering on Alloway.
 

dogg57

Piney
Jan 22, 2007
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Southern NJ
southjerseyphotos.com
Boyd,

For this spring's flurry of presentations I digitized and colored layers of the original McCormick/Andreson map in Keynote, Mac's version of PowerPoint. Rick Radis, NJ Audubon, kindly provided the original for me to use in publication and presentation with proper attribution. Because of copyright concerns, I can not distribute the full diagram.

Dogg,

The area in yellow is predominantly Virginia Pine (Pinus virginiana), or, as the Virginian's call it, Jersey Pine! Its preference is clayey, stony soil over sand. I have gone back and addressed the oversight in the original post.

Cheers,
S-M
Thanks for the Info on the Jersey pine. Always enjoy your wealth of Info you have
 

dragoncjo

Piney
Aug 12, 2005
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camden county
Sections of Burden Hill Preserve from what I remember are pretty piney. Pine barrens to me is where the species that are unique to the barrens live....and given that Folsom is straight up barrens.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,205
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Pines; Bamber area
I share Manumuskin's irk. Overemphasizing the Core Area diminishes the significance of the rest of the Pine Barrens, areas every bit as worthy of our admiration.

Mark, that irk is only felt by those living southwest of the Mullica, I'm sure. Reminds me of those who own Apple computers--they feel a similar irk when they think of Microsoft.

:D
 

Spung-Man

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Jan 5, 2009
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Richland, NJ
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Reminds me of those who own Apple computers--they feel a similar irk when they think of Microsoft.

Bob,

Us rock-jumpers (people below the Mullica) are mighty appreciative to be considered as living in Mac's realm. All the software's written for the PC, and it has 86% of the market share, but once you've tried Mac, you'll never go back. Thanks for the Beck quote, too!
 
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