Managing Our Resources

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JeffD

Guest
I don't own a chain saw either, Ben. It's a joke. It's satire. People who don't agree completely with the radical environmentalists are portrayed as someone who just wantonly wants to destroy the enviornment, like the lumber barons of the 19th century. :D 8)

By the way, I'm thinking maybe that the chainsaw gang would either lift a go-kart into the ring or steal the Snake Charmer's dirt bike. I can hear the announcer saying: The Snake Hater is taking the Snake Charmer's motocycle. Where's he going with it. It looks like he's heading towards the ring. His team members just helped him bring it inside the ring. Look! He's chasing the snake :shock: :wink: :bounce: ...
 
B

bach2yoga

Guest
Ah, but wait...what's that? The music of the snake charmer has brought the chain saw to life! And it is sawing down a large pine...and down it goes...right onto Jeff's foot...no, wait, it missed...the snake charmer jumps onto his bike, flies over the pine and quickly rescues the snake.
And they all lived happily ever after. And the snake's eggs all hatched under Jeff's front porch.
The end.
Renee
 
B

bach2yoga

Guest
Ben wrote:
I gave you and Jeff your own special titles though.

I thought Jeff was the SNAKE HATER and Bob was the SNAKE CHARMER.
:p

I love these emoticons, btw, they're great!

Renee
 
J

JeffD

Guest
And it also provides a touch of irony! :)

SNAKE HATER is a bit of hyperbole. In reality, I just don't cotton to the state going out of its way to protect a poisionus snake. I understand that they are a part of the natural community, but I don't think we humans are obligated to return the envionment EXACTLY the way it was before humans altered it. After all, wild animals even alter the environment is some ways. I just think the state should at least use common sense and not try to bring in snakes where they would be an immediate danger to people who follow the rules and stay on the trails and other designated areas. In other words, people shouldn't do alot of bushwacking in the woods. Leave the Bush wacking to critics of our President.

Years ago, someone from the Nature Conservancy in Pennsylvania explained to me that because much of the woods in southeastern Pennsylvania have been cleared for farms and development, in certain areas the number of certain species of birds dwindled and others, which were more suited for areas where the woods and fields are close (I think it's called the ecotone or something), increased. The ecological community is stable but somewhat altered. There's just a problem if there are major, abrupt changes in the environment.

I also remember years ago, when he was a congressman, Pete Kostmayer sending me an article that argued that all species should be treated equally. I don't agree with that. I would rather have doves in my yard than crows! The public seems to have given much support to the campaign to protect the Pine Barrens Tree Frog, as was discussed on the PBE board that many of us here have posted on. The Timber Rattlesnake doesn't seem to have gotten the public support that the Tree Frog has. I guess you could say that the Timber Rattler has a face only an environmentalist can love. :wink: :) 8)
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,100
4,191
Pines; Bamber area
Jeff, you don't think people should bushwack in the woods? You can't mean that.

What a boring life it would be if I were dissuaded from exploring the truly wild areas (what little are left).

And you would like no snakes and doves instead of crows. You don't like a little variety do you?

What about Heckle and Jeckle? Those guys are cool. The doves don't even talk, they cooo!

Get out there and dive right in. Stop wishing you lived in a bubble.
 

Ben Ruset

Administrator
Site Administrator
Oct 12, 2004
7,616
1,857
Monmouth County
www.benruset.com
Bob, that post is dripping with sarcasm. 8)

I personally would rather have doves in my house. Which, as a strange coincidence, I do.

Mvc-004l.jpg


Meet Dove and Ivory, my Ringneck doves. Sorry for the crappy picture, and window blind that is falling apart. :(
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,508
8,046
And you wallet will be empty. Ah married life...

Guy
 
J

JeffD

Guest
Bushwacking

I said people shouldn't do ALOT of bushwacking in the forest, Bob. I'll qualify that. In areas that are heavily visited or along trails, like the Batona, where there are heavy areas of brush and trees that form a border it's not good to bushwack. It is great, however, to get off the beaten track, in clearings, away from trails, in places such as at the Hampton Furnace. It was interesting exploring around the furnace area. I found some bulb plants that had been planted at the site, between the furnace ruins and the Basto.

In Wells Mills County Park, which is basically a haven for hikers, with a network of trails, it's not a good idea to scurry in all kind of directions. If everybody did that, this would create extra trails. This would impact the environment :wink: and could confuse hikers who are trying to follow the trail.

When you bushwack through heavy brush through the woods, you go at your own risk. I don't think someone who's leary of snakes has a beef if he/she gets bitten under those circumstances.
 

Ben Ruset

Administrator
Site Administrator
Oct 12, 2004
7,616
1,857
Monmouth County
www.benruset.com
I think there's a difference between bushwacking (which to me involves a machette and cutting through vines and creepers looking for Aztec ruins) and walking off a path, which is what Bob and I did looking for ruins at Aserdaten.

Granted if all of us had walked through there, we might have flattened a few briars... :grin:
 
J

JeffD

Guest
A regular employee I worked with when I worked a seasonal job with the U.S. Forest Service years ago used the term buskwhacking to denote getting of a regular trail and trudging through the vegetation.

Getting off the trail in some areas occasionally is OK, at least in an relatively isolated area where scads of folks won't take exactly the same route(s).
t
When I first moved into my house years ago, there was a rough path that ran from the edge of my neighbor's driveway, a few feet in front of my house almost to my driveway. It was a result of the mailman taking that same route, perhaps since the houses were first built in the early 50's. I planted thorn bushes between the yards to stop that. But, alas, this is Levittown, where people are creatures of habit, to the extreme. Shortly after I planted the thorn bushes, one day as I was coming home, I saw the mailman ploughing through the thorn bushes, struggling with the thorn branches but still robotically continuing his programmed route. He looked like freggin Rambo, but with a straight face. I called to him, "hey, what are you doing? I put those bushes up to keep people from cutting through." He didn't seem to understand. After several calls and letters to the postal authority, and as the bushes grew in and other fortifications I put up blocked the way, the carrier route was detoured, permanently! Shortly after, the lawn grew in as if nothing happened. It had looked terrible. When it rained, there was mud. During hot, dry periods, it was dusty.
 
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