Pine Barren History Shorts

The Wick

Scout
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NJ must be an attraction for military proving grounds, Lakehurst NAS started out as a Russian Imperial artillery testing ground, plus Sandy Hook and Amatol
 

Teegate

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A 1958 article mentions that Charles I. Wilson (Budd Wilson's father) was probing around at Batsto and felt he had found the ruins of the Batsto Furnace. Wilson at the time was Captain of the Delaware River Port Authority. He left a note for James A. Starkey who was the head of the Vineland High School Science Department and the state archeologist that summer. Before the week was out Starkey had a suspicion that the furnace site had been found. He had driven 180 test holes and 18 trenches to come to the conclusion it was the proper location. A slag pile nearby also aided in his conformation.

The location of the furnace was on the edge of a sunken area formally used by Joseph Wharton as a private carp pond.
 

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I was going to write up an interesting event that happened in 1927 along what today is route 206 by Dave's road, but have decided to just post this link if you are interested in reading about it. However, I will give you some information that is not at the link which I think you should know before reading it.

One of 4 people who came upon the murder scene right after it happened was the Italian piney Dave Amato who you may remember from many posts on this site about him. Dave's house is still standing along Dave's Road. Dave was traveling with another man when they came upon Margaret Thompson Lilliendahl along the Great Swamp Road (Route 206 today) right after she claimed two men had jumped on their running board and killed her husband. Dave would eventually go to court and testify to the events he saw upon his arrival at the scene. The events of this incident would captivate the local newspapers, including overseas, from the day it occurred in mid September 1927 until the end of the trial in 1928. Incidentally, my mom was born while the trial itself was taking place.

http://malefactorsregister.com/wp/if-this-is-manslaughter/

The link above mentions Mrs. Lilliendahl's son Alfred and you can read about his life here.

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/hartfordcourant/obituary.aspx?n=alfred-t-lilliendahl&pid=188486698&fhid=4122
 

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1935

Laurel Oak Tree Found Growing in State Forest

The state Conservation Department reported today CCC workers, in Bass River State Forest, had discovered the only laurel oak tree known to be growing in New Jersey.
The tree, known as a shingle oak was identified by Alfred Rehder, curator of herbarium, Harvard University. It was estimated to be several hundred years old. The species is a native of mid-western states.

The question is.....is it still there and where?
 
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Rooftree

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The laurel oak (Quercus laurifolia) and shingle oak (Quercus imbricaria) are two different species. However, the shingle oak is also known as northern laurel oak. It must be the shingle oak found in Bass River SF since it is native to the Midwest states. The laurel oak is native to the southeastern states. I don't known if the shingle oak is still growing in Bass River SF, but there is one in Morristown, NJ. It is a NJ Champion tree. There is a laurel oak growing in Trenton. Also on the list. Maybe the shingle oak got cut down since it is not native, or it is hiding among the white pines.
 

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Have you ever wondered how much it cost to build at least portions of Route 72, and who actually built it? Here are the answers and more.



On September 5, 1935 it was announced the low bid for construction of Route S-40 (Route 72) between the 4 mile circle and Butler Place (Jersey Central RR bridge basically) was $184,664. In all 13 contractors bid for the chance to build.

Low bid was $184, 664 from S. J. Groves & Sons of Ridgewood.

Second low was $195,019 P. Cammillo & Co., of Westfield

Third low was $205,357 Utility Construction Company, of New Brunswick

In one week from the printing of this article bids were going to be accepted for the final portion in Burlington County from Butler Place to the Ocean County line. It is interesting to note that one article says asphalt is going to be used and another says concrete. In the end concrete was obviously used because it is concrete under the current asphalt.
 
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It is interesting to note that in the July 13, 1931 Courier Post there is an article about the first Carranza Memorial service the day before. So the first dedication services were July 12, 1931. Take note that the plane was found in a bog, not at the location where the memorial is currently at. Also, take note that the person that was reported to have found the body is not who this article says found it.


I have edited this for size.

Mt. Holly, July 13.

A tall stone shaft in a setting of thousands of pine trees, today stand in its impressive loneliness as a monument to the memory of Capt. Emillio Carranza, Mexican army flying ace, who crashed to his death three years ago yesterday in the Burlington County pine belt near Chatsworth.

Late that afternoon farmers in the Chatsworth vicinity said they saw a plane flying high while lightning flashed and thunder roared. They then saw the plane fall, they reported. Arthur Carabine, then a Burlington county detective, went in search of the plane and found it mired IN THE BOGS which interspersed the pine belt. Carabine later was decorated by the Mexican government for his efforts in recovering the body.



I suspect that after reading this article in the paper John B Capewell decided to visit the location, the sawmill nearby and doing so he crossed the Skit branch and that is when his photos were taken.


https://forums.njpinebarrens.com/threads/capewell-glass-negative-collection.7993/page-9#post-109546



https://forums.njpinebarrens.com/threads/capewell-glass-negative-collection.7993/page-9#post-109324


https://forums.njpinebarrens.com/threads/capewell-glass-negative-collection.7993/page-10#post-109808


https://forums.njpinebarrens.com/threads/capewell-glass-negative-collection.7993/page-11#post-109965
 
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We learn who actually widened Carranza Road and that they called it Sandy Ridge Road.


Road To Be Worked In Tabernacle Twp.

State and WPA Join in Project Providing 2459 Man Weeks Labor

Trenton, July 26 , 1939 State Highway Commissioner E. Donald Sterner today approved an agreement with Tabernacle township to include the improvement of Sandy Ridge road in the state highway department WPA program.

The project will provide 2459 man weeks of employment, with materials to be purchased through a grant of state aid and labor to be supplied by the WPA.

Gravel base, 20 feet wide, will be placed for three and two tenths miles. The graded width of the road is 30 feet. The improvement will extend from Friendship Bogs to the monument erected in honor of Carranza, the Mexican food-will flier who fell to his death near Chatsworth.
 

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One year later.

Project For Road Repairs Get Okay Of State

October 10, 1940

Work for Burlington County Men

Edited

The Burlington County Freeholders were authorized to employ local residents on the construction of the Springer Creek Bridge on Atsion-Hampton Road and the Friendship Bogs Bridge.

Update: Springers Book is creosoted timber at a new location ($4800), and the Friendship Bog bridge is creosoted timber ($3200)
 
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Fire in morning routs three from Pine Barren hunt club.

12/13/1982

Three hunters fled in their underwear through Burlington County's Pine Barrens yesterday morning as a fire destroyed the Cape Isand Deer Club nestled along Leektown Road.
Only one wall of the 75 year old South Jersey hunter's club, known to generations of Pine Barrens residents, was left standing when the 20 by 40 foot frame building caught fire at about 8AM after a makeshift stove overheated. A pickup truck nearby also burned, state police said.
The fire routed three men sleeping in bunk beds after they had closed out the deer season in which club members had bagged only three deer. The hunters, including one 70 year old man, escaped wholly uninjured but nearly unclothed into the freezing morning in lower Burlington County.


https://maps.njpinebarrens.com/#lat=39.6241520266669&lng=-74.46361172597886&z=19&type=hybrid&gpx=
 

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Here is more info.

Five fire departments including three from Ocean County, helped extinguish a blaze at the Cape Island Deer Club, Route 679 yesterday morning.
State police at the Tuckerton barracks said the fire, which destroyed the club, was apparently caused by a wood burning stove.

Three men, Albert H. Sherretto, Cape May, and Tony and Sam Keyes, both of Upper Township, who were sleeping in the club suffered minor injuries.

The men were awakened by the smoke and heat and were able to run to a nearby house in their underwear for shelter, police said. They were treated for minor exposure by first aid members.

Police said the fire started at about 8AM near the stove and spread throughout the building.

Also destroyed was a pickup truck parked next to the club.

Fire departments for West Tuckerton, Eagleswood Township, Mystic Island in Little Egg Harbor Township, New Gretna, here, and Lower Bank in Washington Township responded to the fire.
 
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High Places In NJ

June 1901

Seriously edited.

But Jemima Mount, a camp-meeting rendeavous of long ago, raises its verdure-crowned head just 99 feet.
 

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In 1940 Henry Beck was again visiting Martha Furnace with John Gill who was a Haddonfield naturalist, and they discovered that someone had found the 500 pound cupola of the forge at Martha. The jersey Bog iron was laying by the raceway where it had been dragged waiting for someone to return and remove it. Keep in mind this property was at this time owned by the Wharton Estate.

In the article below from April 1940, "Jersey Industry" is mentioned which is a publication that the newspaper apparently prints occasionally.


Edited:


Bog Iron Bar Shows Name Of Old Forge

Jersey Industry Seizes Rare Find at Martha Furnace

Acting to rescue for NJ what may prove one of the most valuable finds linked with an industrial era that is almost forgotten, Jersey Industry tuned archaeologist this week, taking possession of a 500 pound bar of bog iron, at least a century old.

Not only is it an authentic bar of Jersey's own iron of the forge and furnace days but it is a relic plainly stamped with the name of the forge village that produced it --- Martha.

State Notified of Find

At the time Beck notified the Department of Conservation and Development of the discovery, urging the department to make arrangements to perhaps be placed in the state museum. The department, it was understood, was proceeding along unorthodox channels, contacting the Wharton estate. It was further assumed that the bar had been obtained and that an announcement would be made that it had been placed on exhibit in a setting it deserves.
This week however, Beck found the bar still there, moved by the same or new marauders several feet nearer the old raceway, where an obvious attempt had been made to hurl it to the bottom in several feet of murky water. Perhaps it was someone's plan to hide it and salvage it later on.

Thus Jersey Industry acted on the principle that possession is nine points of the law, at the same time announcing the bar from Martha is in safe keeping until such time as all the red tape has been cut.Sheltered from the weather of the woods and protected from the miscreants who through more than a century have stolen and sold some of the best relics of early industry, the bar will be held pending new developments.Unquestionably, a product of Martha Furnace belongs in the state museum.

Beck recalled that less than ten years ago two large stone wheels of grist mill were half buried in a hole near the lake, formed by the dammed Oswego River, at Martha. A short time later, it was discovered, the wheels were stolen. A sawmill was built by Jonathan Hough at Martha in 1758.

The Jonathan Hough stone

IMG_1312.jpg


Tradition says that a mile above the furnace there was a brickyard which unquestionably yielded the bricks that lie today under overgrown trees and layers of moss in the wreck of the cupola. Over the doorway there was once an iron plate, probably a furnace product, bearing the inscription, "Issac Potts, 1793." This vanished long ago. Authorities have said that two trip hammer heads, weighing hundred's of pounds, were removed and sold for scrap iron during the Spanish-American war.

Obviously so tangible a remembrance of an industry so important, a village furnace so outstanding and an owner so celebrated deserves a better setting than a clearing in the woods or the yard of a junk dealer.



One month later in late May 1940 this is published. Edited:


Relic of Martha Furnace Awaits Owner's Intention

Several weeks ago, after Jersey Industry had assumed charge of a 500-pound ingot of NJ iron, announcement was made that the "protective custody" would be terminated when assurance was given that the relic would attain its proper place.

The NJ State Museum was suggested and copies of the article were forwarded the museum, the Department of Conservation and persons believed interested.

Two weeks ago the overseer of this section of the Wharton Estate said that the estate had brought Jersey Industry's action to his attention. Following that, counsel for the newspaper revealed that a representative of the Girard Trust Company, trustees for the estate, had conferred with him.

Upon insistence of the Wharton Estate through the trustee, the Girard Trust company, the ingot from Martha is about to be returned to the estate overseer. Jersey Industry hopes it is not going back to rust in the woods. Jersey Industry can do no more than hope.The legal owners of this relic have divulged no information as to its ultimate destination.

The question is, where exactly is this relic???
 
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