The Jersey Taverns

Apr 6, 2004
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Galloway
Awesome article, Ben. One of my favorites yet! I'm wondering where the beer was brewed. Was it shipped from England? How much brewing was done in the Pines?

Also, I have but one suggestion to you: I think you should note that you are using the term 'beer' in the archaic sense of 'lager'.
 

Ben Ruset

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None of the sources I used even touched on where the alcohol came from. I'm guessing some of it was imported from England, some of it was made locally. Rum came from the Caribbean.

Apple brandy was definitely made in the Pines, and I'd assume that cider was made locally as well.
 

glowordz

Explorer
Jan 19, 2009
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Very interesting and an excellent resource to keep in my NJ History file! I've read that NJ taverns played a vital part in events like the American Revolution but have never seen such a useful summary. Details such as the cost of meals or lodging are a great addition. The mention of cockfighting reminds me that this horrific practice still goes on in the South, also "clandestinely" held. Not far from where I live is a field of birds being raised for fights . . . but no one can prove it.

Thanks, Ben!
Glo
 

Pine Baron

Explorer
Feb 23, 2008
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Sandy Run
Very nice article, Ben! Can't imagine the amount the research. Exploring pineland taverns is one of my favorite interests. Especially liked the Tavern Price Schedule.

Thanks,
John-
 

bobpbx

Piney
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Oct 25, 2002
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Pines; Bamber area
I was at Cedar Bridge today Ben...I like your article. I was amused at the part about allowing Indians to imbibe...."The court modified the measure shortly thereafter to allow the sale of liquor to the Indians in small measure provided that the Indians depart “into ye Woods to drinke ye same there, yt [that] soe the people may be nee disturbed by them.”"

Me and my buddies were banished to the woods all the time to drink, so I can understand that clearly. :D

In the third paragraph down...."No person or persons shall at any time under any pretence or Colour whatsoever undertake to be a Common Victuler"....what do they mean by Colour?
 

bobpbx

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Oct 25, 2002
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My wild guess would be "authority", as in the use of "colors" to mean "flag"?

I think you may be on to something....gives me an idea....how about this: .a color reflects something...gives it an attribute. Suppose someone tried to misrepresent themselves as important...untouchable by commoners if you will. That would make sense.
 

Ben Ruset

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From the Oxford English Dictionary:

A plausible but in reality false plea intended to make the point to be decided appear to be one of law and not of fact and hence a matter for the decision of the judge rather than the jury. Also in extended use. Now hist.


1531 St. German's Secunde Dyaloge Doctour & Student (new ed.) liv. f. cxlvi, The playntyfe claymynge in by a colour of a dede of feoffemente.
1579 W. Fulke Heskins Parl. Repealed in D. Heskins Ouerthrowne 89 Hee wil giue colour to the plaintife, and apply the reason vsed agaynste priuate masse by the proclamer.
1607 J. Cowell Interpreter sig. Q1v/2, Colour (Color) signifieth in the common law, a probable plee, but in truth false, and hath this end, to draw the triall of the cause from the Iury to the Iudges.
1768 W. Blackstone Comm. Laws Eng. III. 309 An appearance or colour of title, bad indeed in point of law, but of which the jury are not competent judges.
1806 E. Lawes Elem. Treat. Pleading in Civil Actions vi. 129 It is observable that in all cases where the defence consists of matter of law, the plaintiff may be said to have an implied colour of action.
1847 Rep. Cases Court Exchequer Pleas 302/1 in Law Jrnl. Rep. 25, It‥gives express colour to the plaintiff, and states his possession at the time of the trespasses under a charter of demise without livery.
1959 Earl Jowitt & C. Walsh Dict. Eng. Law I. 410/1 Express colour was abolished by the Common Law Procedure Act, 1852, s. 64: implied colour, which had been known to the law for over five hundred years, disappeared when the Judicature Act, 1873, came into force.
 
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bobpbx

Piney
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Oct 25, 2002
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Hmm, I'm not onboard with that guys. This really interests me, so Idon't want to just let your assertion rest as factual without good reason. The definition you are using would be something one would see in a courtroom, after they had been charged with something. I think there is another definition more suitable....which is...."an apperance or pretence taken as justification..." (Websters International Second ed....color 10). What I'm leaning towards is best explained by this link below (for instance, a local authority opens up at tavern without a license and gives the impression that he has that right due to his position). I know this is not perfectly clean, but I think it's closer to the target. I think it's more visually seen when you think of a the man who opens the tavern without authority to do so, and then struts around behind the bar in confidence as if he HAS a license.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_color_of_authority
 

the wallings

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Oct 13, 2011
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can somone please give us directions to greenbank inn, stoped there once but dont rember the way! p.s. nice writing Ben!
 
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