Cape May County Explorations

Rooftree

Explorer
Mar 24, 2017
374
606
78
Haddon Township
So, you feel it is a Morus rubra (Red) Based on the straight ridges of the tree trunk and the leaf.. Did you see any leaves with side lobes, but that's not required. Is the size of the leaf 4 to 7 inches, with fine hairs on the under side. Our photo shows the trunk as straight curvy deep ridges, as I see it as a more scaly texture with straight ridges.. Did you meaure the circumference of the tree trunk. How tall in the trunk? Any fruit?

With all said, you may be correct. This is what I've been using to ID a Mulberry.


BTW; the Red Mulberry (S2?) is suppose to be present in Cape May County, as is the Swamp Cottonwood (S2). Both would be great finds.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
No, it's Morus alba. I never thought it definitely was Morus rubra. I spoke to my friend, who's good on these. His comments:

" (that is) classic (+/-) hybrid material. Tips not long accuminate enough; has to be hairy on surface below; no shine on top surface; petiole also has to be obviously hairy. This is the morus that is most annoying that I run into--very suggestive of rubrum but short one or more characters. Keep looking...can't believe this species is gone from the state."
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
Yes, I agree. It is a hybrid. Did you open the link for 'red mulberry vs white mulberry". I think it is good site.

Well. keep looking.
Yes, I did open that, and it's got a few good tips. I like how it noted that if the leaves are lobed, even the lobes can have long tips.
 

Spung-Man

Explorer
Jan 5, 2009
980
668
64
Richland, NJ
loki.stockton.edu
When I see a mulberry tree in the Pine Barrens, livestock first comes to mind. Garden farms here planted them as feed supplement to cut production costs. Smith’s (1953) book, Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture was a popular guide that was promoted by Soil Conservation Service. A copy resided on our Richland Garden Farm bookshelf. Chapter X was titled, “A summer pasture tree for swine and poultry—the mulberry.” Mulberries were commonplace in chicken runs.

According to The Vineland Historical Magazine (1930: 196), in 1878 Charles K. Landis formed an Italian Silk Growers Society, which was active in the New Italy and Garden Road settlements. Fourteen of the families had grown silk back in Italy.

S-M
 
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bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
When I see a mulberry tree in the Pine Barrens, livestock first comes to mind. Garden farms here planted them as feed supplement to cut production costs. Smith’s (1953) book, Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture was a popular guide that was promoted by Soil Conservation Service. A copy resided on our Richland Garden Farm bookshelf. Chapter X was titled, “A summer pasture tree for swine and poultry—the mulberry.” Mulberries were commonplace in chicken runs.

According to The Vineland Historical Magazine (1930: 196), in 1878 Charles K. Landis formed an Italian Silk Growers Society, which was active in the New Italy and Garden Road settlements. Fourteen of the families had grown silk back in Italy.

S-M
That's interesting Mark, and it makes sense. I lived in Augusta Georgia (army brat) for 3 years, and there was one outside my bedroom window. I was 5 or so, and I loved eating them.

If you find one down your way that is a true Morus rubra, and not a Morus alba or a hybrid with M. alba, let me know, I'd like to see it.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
Uh oh. This is trouble with a capital T.

IMG_1944a.JPG
 

GermanG

Piney
Apr 2, 2005
1,134
458
Little Egg Harbor
As for the trees, going from left to right, I'm going to say Atlantic white cedar, Sourgum, Red Maple, and Sweetbay Magnolia. My confidence with those also decreases as I move towards the right.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
As for the trees, going from left to right, I'm going to say Atlantic white cedar, Sourgum, Red Maple, and Sweetbay Magnolia. My confidence with those also decreases as I move towards the right.
Very good. My confidence decreases every time I look up to see the leaves. They are either all jumbled up with other branches from other trees, or it's too dark to see them. I remember the third one as being American Holly.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
This plant appeas to be Toxicodendron vernix.
Yes, it's a bad actor. A couple weeks ago I was along a stream, and I saw a branch out of the corner of my eye next to me which was even with the top of my head. I moved the top of my hand to some of the leaves to tilt the branch up. I immediated recognized it was poison sumac. A few bisters formed on the top of my fingers over the next few days, and nothing could stop the itching. I had to wait a week.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,420
4,541
Pines; Bamber area
Another plant fronting on Petersberg road. Very lush here. I have the same plant from roadside bamber. You cound fit 4 leaves of the bamber one into one of these.

DSC01561a.JPG
 
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