Pine Barren History Shorts

Pan

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Teegate

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11/19/1931

S. G. Conkling, of the Germanic Fire Insurance Company, of NY, presented to the board, by letter, a claim of the company for $1074.78, which money was paid by the company of Frank S. Ashmead, Jr., of NY, for damage done to his truck on August 25, 1930, when the center of Godfrey Bridge, in Washington Township between Little Hawkins and Hammonton, gave way as his truck was passing over it. The matter was referred to County Solicitor Harold B. Wells.
 

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1/28/1864

The oldest Inhabitant.

There is now living at Chetwood, Washington Township, in the county, on the old Martha Furnace property, a man named William Henry Schultz, who was born in Germany, in 1759, and is now 104 years old. He left a vessel in Philadelphia, in 1776, and learned the Cooper's trade, at which he worked many years, and about 1810 removed to Batsto, and afterward to near Martha Furnace, where he has children now living. Until within a few months, his facilities were all good, and he could convert very well; his hearing and eyesight are now failing, and he rarely leaves his bed. He lives with his son-in-law, Daniel McCoy.
 
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bobpbx

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1/28/1864

The oldest Inhabitant.

There is now living at Chetwood, Washington Township, in the county, on the old Martha Furnace property, a man named William Henry Schultz, who was born in Germany, in 1759, and is now 104 years old. He left a vessel in Philadelphia, in 1776, and learned the Cooper's trade, at which he worked many years, and about 1810 removed to Batsto, and afterward to near Martha Furnace, where he has children now living. Until within a few months, his facilities were all good, and he could convert very well; his hearing and eyesight are now failing, and he rarely leaves his bed. He lives with his son-in-law, Daniel McCoy.
Imagine sitting down and talking to that guy when he was spry and quick with his memory.
 
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I searched for deeds and found no records for that club. I tried all different names and failed to find anything. I will continue to try. I may have to go to the clerks office and look there.

Did you notice the stone location is now right in the backyard of a large house. I have to assume it is no longer there.
 

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1/4/1832 Tuckerton

A person by the name of George Lungin, near this place, on his return from Martha Furnace, which he left at sunset, for his place of abode, on the 21st, was found frozen to death. It is believed that he expected to warm himself at a house in the woods, on his way, about five miles from Martha, and the same distance from his home, but upon his arrival he found the family had abandoned the premises, and there being no fire to warm him, he fell victim to the intensity if the cold, at the door of the house. Information being given by a traveler, to the Coroner at this place, he repaired to the spot and delivered the lifeless body over to friends. He has left a wife and two children to lament his sudden and unexpected death.
 

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While typing this I realized it is not our Sandy Ridge. In any event, here it is.

1876

A man named Charles Marshall, living near Sandy Ridge, committed suicide a few days ago by taking a large dose of laudanum (Opium). He took it on going to bed, and by the time it was known what he had done he was beyond medical aid. He leaves a wife and four children.


 

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9/21/1939

Twelve pickers from the Ralph Haines cranberry bogs were injured Saturday night when the truck they were riding overturned, near the Birches. No serious injuries resulted. Four of the injured were treated at the office of Dr. Betts, while the rest were taken to the Burlington County Hospital for treatment.
 

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1/5/1975

Rifle Shot in Leg Called Accidental

Bass River Township

Scott J. Tkacs, Metuchen, was treated at Southern Ocean Hospital, Stafford Township, for a leg wound he accidentally inflicted while cleaning his gun Friday at the Highland Park Field & Stream Gun Club, Martha Rd., police said.

State police at the Tuckerton barracks said Tkacs' .22 caliber rifle discharged a bullet into his right calf. A friend who had accompanied Tkacs transported him to the hospital at 8:30 p.m.. Trooper Dory Saul is investigating.
 
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bobpbx

Piney
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State police at the Tuckerton barracks said Tkacs' .22 caliber rifle discharged a bullet into his right calf. A friend who had accompanied Tkacs transported him to the hospital at 8:30 p.m.. Trooper Dory Saul is investigating.
That sounds fishy, or at the very least, downright foolish.
 

Boyd

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I don't know anything about Van Note's, but when I lived in Central NY near Lake Ontario, people would say "camp" where we might say "cabin" or just "home" around here. For example, John Smith might say "I'll be spending the weekend at my camp on Lake Onieda" and it might be refered to as "John Smith's Camp". Don't recall seeing "camp" used this way in the Pines, but is it possible that this was just a summer home for the Van Note family?
 
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I don't know anything about Van Note's, but when I lived in Central NY near Lake Ontario, people would say "camp" where we might say "cabin" or just "home" around here. For example, John Smith might say "I'll be spending the weekend at my camp on Lake Onieda" and it might be refered to as "John Smith's Camp". Don't recall seeing "camp" used this way in the Pines, but is it possible that this was just a summer home for the Van Note family?

That could be true. Did they think everyone knew who the Van Notes were .... whoever they were?
 
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June 10, 1937

This is one of my favorite articles. I have worked on this one for quite a few years and basically have come up empty looking for something mentioned in it. Beck found and took a photo but it has eluded me. It may have been destroyed by the CCC. Anyway, I used dictation so hopefully I have corrected all the errors.



Although Butler Place situated about 5 miles east of the traffic circle along state highway route S 41, Lebanon State Forest Burlington Ocean counties, is relatively new in the galaxy of picnic areas created and developed by the CCC under the supervision of the department of conservation and development.

For more than 66 years, the spot provided rest, refreshment and shelter for travelers and figured prominently in the history and social and industrial activities of this section of South Jersey for many decades. Before the popular inn, Butler Place, from which this spot received his name was erected here in 1830, it is said that the Grove played an important part in the war of 1812. According to local historic legends, it served as a hiding place for the settlers cattle during those stirring days when the British were harrying this region.

When word was received that the red coats were about to raid the small settlements and farms along the coast the settlers would gather their livestock and drive it along old Buddtown Barnegat Road, now part of State Highway route S 40, to what is now Butler Place distance of some 30 miles.Here the cattle were safely hidden away from the raiders until the danger had passed.

Later, Buddtown-Barnegat Road became a thoroughfare for travelers with their white canvas-covered wagons, called "she tops." These traders carried flower and feed to the towns along the shore and return with clams and other seafood. As this trafficking increased, and because the teams were able to travel only about 20 miles a day, many inns sprang up along the route. In this way, Butler Place came into being about 1830, and was one of the best-known hostelries along the road. It was situated at the intersection of the Buddtown-Barnegat and Woodmansie-Chatsworth road.

Buchanan and Smock. lumber dealers of Asbury Park build a sawmill opposite Butler Place, which started operating in 1892. Cedar shingles were manufactured here by the thousands and shipped to Asbury Park. It was not unusual for the mill to cut from 18,000 to 40,000 shingles in a day from the cedar logs obtained in the nearby Gates swamp.

In 1896 after the cedar swamp have been cut over so that operations of the mill was no longer profitable, The mill was abandoned and famous old Butler place, which had operated continuously for about 66 years, closed it's doors forever.

Today, nothing remains of old Butler Place. On it's site the CCC under the direction of Department of Conservation and Development, has developed a beautiful grove of young pines and gray birches and provided a supply of potable water, parking space, picnic tables and benches and comfort stations for motorist using Route S-40 so they may rest while driving between the metropolitan areas and the shore resorts.
 

Boyd

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Today, nothing remains of old Butler Place. On it's site the CCC under the direction of Department of Conservation and Development, has developed a beautiful grove of young pines and gray birches and provided a supply of potable water, parking space, picnic tables and benches and comfort stations for motorist using Route S-40 so they may rest while driving between the metropolitan areas and the shore resorts.

Very cool, I have wondered about Butler Place before. The 1949 USGS topo shows the recreation area but doesn't have the Butler Place name, so I never quite made the connection before.

1949.png


But the other historic topo's show the name as Butler's Place. Somehow that got shortened to just Butler Place over the years, I guess.

The part about Route S-40 is interesting. I know that the present Route 70 used to be Route 40, so that confused me. The present Route 72 isn't labelled on the WPA map, however, if you look at the Eastern end it does show the S-40 number. So, in the past you could take either Route 40 or the Southern Route S-40 to the shore.

S40.png
 
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Odd Gun Club Name

December 24. 1925

Sharp Bags 3-Snag Buck

A three-snag buck was brought down by Elbert C. Sharp, near Tylertown. Other members of the Nichols Patent Antlers Club who bagged a deer were Walter Hankins, of Vineland, and Ed Graham, of Salem.

 
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I am not posting the complete survey because it is mostly boring, however, you may find this interesting.

April 30, 1912

Is a survey called and known as the Roger's survey situate on the east side of Wading River and is bounded as follows: Beginning at a pine tree for a corner and lettered WRJM, standing on the west side of Ashataman's Branch (Tub Mill Branch) just above the ruins of David Gale's Tub Mill.
 

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July 15, 1954

Gun Club Destroyed

The fire was at the time mowing down hunting cabins in the woods and some outbuildings. Several fire companies were sent to stand guard at Mt. Misery Methodist Girl's camp, on Route 70, near Upton, but found it unnecessary to evacuate the children, who had boarded Army busses sent from Ft. Dix.

Although no homes were destroyed, one of the casualties was the Hamilton Gun Club, on Applejack Rd., near Chatsworth. It burned to the ground.

Mrs. Annie Applegate, of Main st., Chatsworth, was carried from a sick bed to the home of neighbors, when the fire moved within 100 yards of her home.

****************

BTW, the Hamilton Gun Club currently is the one on the road to Apple Pie Hill on the left hand side after Applejack Road on your way in.
 

Bog Mermaid

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One of the most mysterious characters Beck encountered in his travels was Dolph Arens, who in the "Adventure of Aserdaten" chapter of Jersey Genesis was the caretaker of the Eureka Gun Club at Black's Bridge which formally was the Chiselers Club and before that Tilly Collins. And before that it was the home of Zebulon Collins who is residing in the Hollowfield Cemetery at Ten Mile Hollow. Anyway, Dolph has always interested me, maybe just because he was able to show Beck Black's stone. With that in mind lets learn a little more about Dolph Arens, the Chiselers Club, and various other characters. Also keep in mind that I / we are also trying to figure out when Beck actually met Dolph at the club. Remember, when Beck talked with Dolpf in the "Adventure of Aserdaten" (Page 179 in my book) Dolph said the gun club they were in was the EUREKA club, formally Chiselers.


1914

In regards to Dolph's name, Beck spelled his first and last name wrong. Dolph Arens name is actually Adolf Arends, born in German on January 27, 1878 He eventually made it to Waretown living on the Old Road which I suspect is Route 9. He would marry his wife Ella and by 1914 they both were working at Donnelly's Hotel in Waretown. Adolf was the bartender, and Ella was the housekeeper, and she at least had been working there for 18 months when the owner of Donnelly's came to the conclusion she was stealing. Armed with a search warrant, Donnelly and the police entered the Arends home and found the items they were looking for. They consisted of a black walnut bedstead, a glass vase and a glass of crab apple jelly. By September 1914 she was indicted by a grand jury and went to trial. By October she was exonerated and charges were dropped on the grounds that it had not been proven that the goods were stolen.

So at this point we move to 1933 and Beck visits Blacks Bridge. We know this because Beck's newspaper article describing the Chiselers Club and Blacks bridge, as well as a photograph there, was published on April 11, 1933. If he had met Adolf Arends who was the caretaker of the Chiselers club at this point is uncertain; however, keep in mind what I mentioned in the first paragraph about Eureka.


1933

On Monday evening October 23, two individuals, Joel Ridgeway and Clarence VanNote from Bamber had approached Arends at the club to borrow money but were turned away. On Tuesday morning when Arends arrived at the club he found the place burned to the ground. Arends, obviously enraged, notified the state police who found automobile tracks and traced them to Ridgeway and VanNote.

Ridgeway and VanNote admitted to being there but claim the fire was an accident, not arson, which is what they were charged with. The building which was the old Tilly Collins homestead is described as a two-story, six-room frame dwelling that was one of the oldest structures in the county. By March of 1935 Ridgeway would begin a six months jail sentence for theft of carpenter's tools owned by a contractor who was building a bridge on Lacey Road. The tools were found buried in the woods. And by the middle of December VanNote would begin a 90 day jail sentence for not paying a $100 fine for using larger than the legal size shot while hunting. As of yet I have not found if they were charged on not for the arson.


I have to assume that either the Chiselers club was rebuilt, or there was another structure at the location that they could use as the gun club. It still was in use and still called Chiselers as you will see below


1935

If you did not know, Coyle Field along Route 72 is named after Col. Leonidas Coyle, a long time fire warden in NJ. On Saturday May 18, 1935 a 900 acre fire had been brought under control, and at dawn on the day after, Coyle and his pilot flew over the area observing that the fire heading towards Bamber was also out. They then returned to the landing field. At 11AM, on a second flight, Coyle noticed a fire springing up near Bamber. This new fire was 4.5 miles from the previous fire, and near the Chiselers hunting club. Coyle felt it was impossible for this new fire to have started from the previous fire, so he dropped to 150 feet and flew towards the fire. He then noticed spot fires, springing up about 250 feet apart along the roadway to the Chiselers club. Some of the spot fires had merged and as he passed the last fire he noticed a man starting a fire there with a car nearby in a gravel pit. With the fire going into the wind Coyle was certain the man was an arsonist. He took note of the peculiar paint scheme of the car but did not get a good look at the mans face. After landing nearby, Coyle could not find the car in question so he notified the state police.

With the description of the vehicle the authorities were able to go directly to the home of the suspected arsonist who lived in Waretown. That person was none other than Adolf Arends, the caretaker of the Chiselers club, and the man we all read about in Beck's Aserdaten chapter. When questioned, Arends quickly mentioned there was another man with him and they had been at the Chiselers gun club. Arends and Oscar Brown were arrested, spent the night in jail, and released on $1000 bail. Both men claim they were setting backfires but Coyle stated the fires were set to run with the wind and not against it. Coyle's testimony was corroborated by the pilot of the plane. Both Arends and Brown pleaded not guilty and awaited grand jury action. The fire burned 25,000 acres threatening to destroy Forked River, Barnegat and the hometown of both suspects, Waretown. It took over 1000 firefighter to put out the blaze. The cost of the damage was $250,000, covered many square miles, and Coyle called it the greatest forest fire in years. There were two injuries reported, a firefighter from Waretown was severely burned in the explosion of a gasoline torch used in backfiring, and a C.C.C person of color was bitten by a snake.

The facts of this story looked pretty bleak for Arends and Brown, but luck was on their side, when in September of the same year the grand jury voted no bill in the charge against Arends and Brown. Coyle had said he was not able to distinguish the faces of the men when he looked down, and that may have been the reason they were cleared.


And one final note for the year 1935, Clarence VanNote mentioned above as one of the the arsonist of the Chiselers gun club, was arrested for fighting and charged $100. He apparently did not learn his lesson.

With all of this in mind we can see that the Eureka gun club was never mentioned, only the Chiselers. This tells me Beck meeting Adolf at the gun club most likely took place long after Adolf was charged with starting the fire. At the time, Beck most likely did not even know that and may never had known that.


Today, Adolf Arends and his wife Ella reside in the Cedar Grove Cemetery in Waretown. Next to them is most likely a son.

IMG_1886a.jpg


IMG_1888a.jpg



The 1940 census is interesting. It shows Adolf as 62 and head of household, but the only other household member is a 40 year old housekeeper, also from Germany. His occupation was foreman community construction.

1940A.jpg


1940b.jpg
That was a great “real aloud” post…an amazing amount of research here!!!
 
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