Pine Barren History Shorts

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,751
8,384
We again visited the Bates Mill Cemetery after spending some time there 4 years ago. On our previous visit we stopped at the resting place of J. Melvin Chambers who advised Beck that he had missed visiting the Chew Cemetery when passing through previously. Today's visit involved another cast of characters.

On October 13, 1933 Beck's article appeared in the Courier Post describing his search for Bates Mill after receiving a letter asking him to check out the remains there. In the article Beck admits that he receives quite a bit of "chaffing" for spending considerable amounts of time in or near cemeteries but he went ahead anyway and stopped in at the Bates Cemetery for a visit. He tells the readers in the article that "he usually gains information from someone in the neighborhood or from the stones themselves."

In this instance he came upon a gentleman named Christian Lehman from Pleasantville who as a boy had lived in the house across the field from where they currently were standing, and who was there trimming the grave site of his parents. In their conversation Lehman told Beck that David Bates was the man who could tell him everything he wanted to know. Beck had noticed the grave stone with David Bates name along with his wife's death date of 1921 already on the stone.

Jessica and I on our way home today slipped in the entrance of the cemetery and paid Mr. Bates a visit. And it turns out it appears Christian Lehman had come full circle, and by 1950 was residing there as well.


IMG_9652a.jpg
 
Last edited:

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,751
8,384
May 31, 1950

Christian Lehman, 77: Resided Here 33 Years

Christian Lehman, 77, of 288 N. Mississippi Ave, died yesterday at his home.

An Atlantic City resident for 33 years he was a retired bridge carpenter on the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines. He was born in Darby PA.

He is survived by his wife, Gertrude May; one daughter, Mrs Norma McCully, Ventner, and two grandsons.

Services will be held Saturday. Burial will be in Waterford.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,363
4,499
Pines; Bamber area
May 31, 1950

Christian Lehman, 77: Resided Here 33 Years

Christian Lehman, 77, of 288 N. Mississippi Ave, died yesterday at his home.

An Atlantic City resident for 33 years he was a retired bridge carpenter on the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines. He was born in Darby PA.

He is survived by his wife, Gertrude May; one daughter, Mrs Norma McCully, Ventner, and two grandsons.

Services will be held Saturday. Burial will be in Waterford.
I don't understand why the person's name above his does not seem to belong? Is it Alice Mays Wells?
 

manumuskin

Piney
Jul 20, 2003
8,596
2,513
60
millville nj
www.youtube.com
I just finished reading a book titled "Hillbilly Elegy", which is one man's story of a hillbilly who made it good. I was surprised to learn that there was a huge migration of coal mining Hillbillies from places like Tennessee, Kentucky, and West Virginia to Ohio and other northern states to work at steel mills and similar industries. These industries encouraged people to bring their entire families up, and many did.
My Family migrated to Millville to work in glass factories from WV and some of my family moved to Cleveland Ohio to work there,I still have family in WV and Cleveland along with Missouri and North Carolina.They all scattered to find work from the 40,s to the 70's from southern WV.
When I worked at Wheatons with my Pop Pop in the early 80's I told him this is a hell hole how have you stood to work here all these years.he said boy it beats the coal mines.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,751
8,384
In September of 1934 various readers had written Beck about a mysterious village NW of Martha and on September 21, 1934 he writes about his excursion there. However, he never did find it. But during his ride to get there he travels from Speedwell to Harrisville on the newly resurfaced route 563. Notice what he says about a "notable addition" at Harrisville.

The road connecting Chatsworth and New Gretna has been resurfaced this summer and it is obvious that many of the Lost Town fans do not realize how easy it is to get to Speedwell, Jenkins, Harrisia (Harrisville) and Leektown. Before the traveler reaches the ruined walls of Harris, the burned paper town, a lane (Oswego Road) turns sharply to the left through Camp Penn, where the C.C.C. boys are making something of the Penn State Forest. Harrisia is much the same as when Warner Hargrove first took us there. The trees inside the ruined buildings are taller and there are more vines on the iron-stone used in the building of a village that covered several acres. But the spring in front of the main building flows on and the only "notable addition" is a long house, building for a watchman the Wharton Estate stationed there when campers started stealing stone.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,363
4,499
Pines; Bamber area
In September of 1934 various readers had written Beck about a mysterious village NW of Martha and on September 21, 1934 he writes about his excursion there. However, he never did find it. But during his ride to get there he travels from Speedwell to Harrisville on the newly resurfaced route 563. Notice what he says about a "notable addition" at Harrisville.

The road connecting Chatsworth and New Gretna has been resurfaced this summer and it is obvious that many of the Lost Town fans do not realize how easy it is to get to Speedwell, Jenkins, Harrisia (Harrisville) and Leektown. Before the traveler reaches the ruined walls of Harris, the burned paper town, a lane (Oswego Road) turns sharply to the left through Camp Penn, where the C.C.C. boys are making something of the Penn State Forest. Harrisia is much the same as when Warner Hargrove first took us there. The trees inside the ruined buildings are taller and there are more vines on the iron-stone used in the building of a village that covered several acres. But the spring in front of the main building flows on and the only "notable addition" is a long house, building for a watchman the Wharton Estate stationed there when campers started stealing stone.
Very interesting Guy. Recall I did find a broken CCC plate in the cedar swamp. I've nosed about in that area and saw places where things went on. Damnable place though with the briar.
 

Teegate

Administrator
Site Administrator
Sep 17, 2002
25,751
8,384
Very interesting Guy. Recall I did find a broken CCC plate in the cedar swamp. I've nosed about in that area and saw places where things went on. Damnable place though with the briar.
I am not sure where you are referring to. What cedar swamp?
 
Top