Where is this?

Boyd

Administrator
Staff member
Site Administrator
Jul 31, 2004
9,601
2,838
Ben's Branch, Stephen Creek
In the new LIDAR viewer... coming soon. :)

Screen Shot 2023-05-26 at 4.35.19 PM.png
 
Apr 6, 2004
3,619
564
Galloway
Thanks for checking it out. I was surprised to discover that the road was only built in the 1930s. At first I hypothesized that the woodwork might have supported an earlier bridge but topographic maps and aerial imagery appear to disprove this idea.

If my travels take me to River Road Clam House this weekend, I will take a little detour and give it a look too.
I can see that it was built sometime between 1931 and 1942. Do you have more specific information?
 
Apr 6, 2004
3,619
564
Galloway
Thanks for checking it out. I was surprised to discover that the road was only built in the 1930s. At first I hypothesized that the woodwork might have supported an earlier bridge but topographic maps and aerial imagery appear to disprove this idea.

If my travels take me to River Road Clam House this weekend, I will take a little detour and give it a look too.
I took a quick look today but didn’t see the structure.
 

bobpbx

Piney
Staff member
Oct 25, 2002
14,352
4,492
Pines; Bamber area
You got it!
Isolated clusters expand radially into circles. As they expand, the soil is raised by bioturbation. I’d like to better understand that process.

Apparently, phragmites have been in the area for millennia. Why have they taken over the meadows only recently?
When John said that yesterday I dismissed it, but then I took the bridge over the mullica at green bank on google street view and the round spot on the lidar did indeed turn out to be phragmites. They are highly rhizomotous, so maybe as they expand the root system actually pushes the earth up. Just a theory.
 
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Apr 6, 2004
3,619
564
Galloway
When John said that yesterday I dismissed it, but then I took the bridge over the mullica at green bank on google street view and the round spot on the lidar did indeed turn out to be phragmites. They are highly rhizomotous, so maybe as they expand the root system actually pushes the earth up. Just a theory.
That’s what I’m thinking. How do the roots raise the ground, and why only at the outer edge of the circle?
 

smoke_jumper

Piney
Mar 5, 2012
1,545
1,073
Atco, NJ
You got it!
Isolated clusters expand radially into circles. As they expand, the soil is raised by bioturbation. I’d like to better understand that process.

Apparently, phragmites have been in the area for millennia. Why have they taken over the meadows only recently?
When I was thinking it could be phragmites I never realized they grew in circular clusters. Is the ground actually pushed up or is the base of the plants so dense that the LiDAR sees it as ground. I’d imagine the root system would be more dense around the edges simply because there’s more nutrients there. They could be so thick that they are choking themselves out in the center.
 
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Apr 6, 2004
3,619
564
Galloway
When I was thinking it could be phragmites I never realized they grew in circular clusters. Is the ground actually pushed up or is the base of the plants so dense that the LiDAR sees it as ground. I’d imagine the root system would be more dense around the edges simply because there’s more nutrients there. They could be so thick that they are choking themselves out in the center.
I think some ground-truthing is in order!
 
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